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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "citizenship"
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Book Review: Cornelia Weiss on Helen Irving’s “Constitutions and Gender”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Cornelia Weiss reviews Helen Irving’s Constitutions and Gender (Edward Elgar 2017)] –Cornelia Weiss, Colonel, U.S. Air Force Reserve Judge Advocate Corps* As incredible as it seems, it was not until 1971 that the U.S. Supreme Court ever declared a statute that discriminated against women as unconstitutional.  That

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Published on August 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Should Foreigners Vote in National Legislative Elections?

—Michèle Finck, University of Oxford Next month, voters in Luxembourg will have to participate in a referendum (voting is mandatory in Luxembourg) that raises three different questions, among which is the following: do you agree that those residents that are not Luxembourg nationals should be entitled to participate in national legislative elections under the condition

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Published on May 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments, New Voices
 
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Constitutional Stability Through Citizenship in the Dominican Republic

—Jillian Blake, University of Michigan In a 2010 article, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez describes “Wiki-constitutionalism”—a phenomenon common to Latin American legal systems in which national constitutions are “changed with great frequency and unusual ease.”[1] The Dominican Republic’s system is a stark example of Wiki-constitutionalism; the country has had more than 30 constitutions since achieving independence in 1844.[2]

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Published on September 5, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Silent Greek Crisis: Nationalism, Racism and Immigration

–Christina M. Akrivopoulou, Adjunct Lecturer, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece Ever since the early nineties Greece has become a major destination state for immigrants, mainly due to the fall of the former communist regimes of Eastern Europe. For a number of years immigrants from neighbor countries of the Balkans have resided in Greece as undocumented

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Published on October 3, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis