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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Church and State"
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Buddhism and/in Comparative Constitutional Law

—Dr. Benjamin Schonthal, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand In recent years, a slow but steady tectonic shift has taken place within the study of religion and constitutional law. It was not so long ago that studying religion and constitutional law meant studying the regulation of religion in secular liberal contexts—generally among a limited set of

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Published on June 3, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Challenge to the State Religion Status of Islam in Bangladesh: Back to Square One?

–Ridwanul Hoque, Professor of Law, Dhaka University On March 28, the High Court Division of the Bangladesh Supreme Court summarily dismissed a 28 year-old constitutional petition challenging Islam as the state religion. The court said that the petitioners lacked standing to litigate, but it did not hold any hearing at all.[1] Things, however, are not as

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Published on May 27, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium Report–Constitutionalism, Religious Freedom and Human Rights: Constitutional Migration and Transjudicialism beyond the North Atlantic

–Mirjam Künkler (Princeton University), Shylashri Shankar (Centre for Policy Research, Delhi) and Tine Stein (University of Kiel); Co-organizers for this Symposium held at Schloss Herrenhausen, Hanover, Germany, June 3-6, 2015, funded by the Volkswagen Foundation Creating a framework of religion-state relations that would mollify tensions between religions, within religions, and between believers and non-believers, has been the bane

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Published on January 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments