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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Posts tagged "Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms"
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I-CONnect Symposium on “The Legacy of Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin”–Part IV: Reconciliation and Recognition after “Cultural Genocide”: Beverley McLachlin’s Use of Language

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in our symposium on “The Legacy of Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin.” We are grateful to our six symposium participants for their contributions to this special series of reflections on Canada’s retiring Chief Justice. The introduction to our symposium is available here. Part I of our symposium is available here,

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Published on December 7, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Amen: The Supreme Court of Canada’s Judgment in Mouvement laïque québécois v. Saguenay (City)

–Léonid Sirota, JSD Candidate, NYU School of Law; Lecturer, Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa Faculty of Law One week ago, on April 15, 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada delivered its decision in Mouvement laïque québécois v. Saguenay (City), 2015 SCC 16, holding that the respondent city’s practice of starting municipal council meetings with a prayer

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Published on April 22, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments, New Voices
 
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Cooperative Federalism Divides the Supreme Court of Canada: Quebec (Attorney General) v. Canada (Attorney General)

—Paul Daly, University of Montreal, Faculty of Law On Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada brought to an end the lengthy saga of Canada’s long-gun registry. There was a sharp split on the Court, with a bare majority of five justices giving a narrow win to the federal government over the joint dissent of their three

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Published on March 30, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Supreme Court of Canada on Religious Freedom and Education: Loyola High School v. Québec (Attorney General)

—Benjamin L. Berger, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University The classroom has been a contemporary crucible for working out the relationship between religion and the modern constitutional state.  Whether the issue has been the crucifix on classroom walls in Italy, the pledge of allegiance in U.S. schools, the religious (or was it ethnic?) identity of

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Published on March 23, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Canada’s New Prostitution Bill: Don’t Assume it’s Unconstitutional

—Michael Plaxton, University of Saskatchewan [Twitter: @MichaelPlaxton] Last week, Justice Minister Peter MacKay tabled the much-anticipated Bill C-36, The Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act. The bill, which is a response to the Supreme Court of Canada’s landmark ruling in Bedford, has already been the subject of considerable criticism. In particular, critics contend that

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Published on June 13, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Suspended Declarations of Invalidity and the Rule of Law

—Robert Leckey, McGill University [cross-posted from UK Constitutional Law Blog] In December 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada declared the constitutional invalidity of three major provisions in the domestic criminal law on sex work. Specifically, in Canada (Attorney General) v Bedford, the Court struck down prohibitions against keeping a bawdy-house, living on the avails of

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Published on March 13, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Vanessa MacDonnell

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Vanessa MacDonnell about her forthcoming paper on The Constitution as Framework for Governance. In her paper, Professor MacDonnell proposes a new way of thinking about the role of government, specifically with regard to its affirmative obligations to advance and secure constitutional

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Published on September 15, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices, Reviews