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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Posts tagged "Brexit"
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Cooperative Brexit: Giving Back Control Over Trade Policy (I·CON Volume 15, Issue 2: Editorial)

We invited Thomas Streinz,* Fellow at the Institute for International Law and Justice, NYU School of Law, to contribute a Guest Editorial to our Journal. Taking Joseph Weiler’s recent Editorial, “The Case for a Kinder, Gentler Brexit”, as its starting point, Mr Streinz argues that the principle of “sincere cooperation” requires the Union and a

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Published on July 6, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Legal Uncertainty Surrounding the Approval of the Brexit Agreement

—Antonios Kouroutakis, Assistant Professor, IE University The referendum of June 23rd 2016 and the majority vote in favour of Brexit led British constitutional law into uncharted territories as Paul Craig has accurately said.[1] The constitutional order of the United Kingdom is being overwhelmed by a paradox. Although it is governed by the principle of parliamentary

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Published on June 28, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Safeguarding Democratic Institutions

—Samuel Issacharoff, NYU School of Law [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] A discussion of courts and populism begs for definitional boundaries.  While courts are generally institutionally confined, the same cannot be said for populism, a

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Published on April 29, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part I

—Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* The Politics of Resentment. What is in a Name? It is trite to say that today “resentment” sweeps across Europe. Yet beyond this sweeping statement, the concept itself, its consequences and modus operandi, are

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Published on February 26, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Case for a Kinder, Gentler Brexit

—J.H.H. Weiler, University Professor, European Union Jean Monnet Chair, New York University Law School; Co-Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Constitutional Law Of course, we know better than to be shooting at each other; but the post-June 23 relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union is woefully bellicose, and increasingly so. In tone and mood,

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Published on February 5, 2017
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UK Learns Brexit is Easier Said Than Done

[This post was first published on the website of the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale. It is republished here with permission of the author.] —David R. Cameron, Professor of Political Science, Director of the Program on European Union Studies, Yale University When Prime Minister Theresa May took over

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Published on December 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Where do Justice Ginsburg and Justice Hale—and Judicial Independence—Go from Here?

—Brian Christopher Jones, Liverpool Hope University Both of these influential and widely respected justices have recently tested the limits of judicial speech through provocative and ill-timed statements.[1] Back in July, Justice Ginsburg exclaimed, “I can’t imagine what the country would be—with Donald Trump as our president”, then called Trump a “faker”, and even suggested that she

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Published on November 30, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Ignorance and Democratic Decay: Breaking the Feedback Loop

—Tom Gerald Daly, Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law In September 2014 at the University of Texas, US Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas warned of ‘constitutional ignorance’. Exhorting the audience to familiarise themselves with the text of the US Constitution, he stated: ‘I bet you more people have read the instructions on how to use

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Published on November 17, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Brexit: Court Decisions Reopen Arguments

—Susan Sterett, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Center for Public Administration and Policy Sitting in a field in the English countryside last July by a campfire, my London friends and I talked about Brexit and what it might mean for their friends and their work. Would their European friends who lived in England have to

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Published on November 12, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Crisis and Opportunity: Responding to the Brexit Vote (I·CON 14, Issue 3: Editorial)

The vote by a majority of the British people on June 23 to leave the European Union has precipitated a series of gradually unfolding consequences throughout the United Kingdom, within Europe, and across the world. Comparisons have been drawn to the fall of the Berlin Wall, in terms of the magnitude and geopolitical significance of

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Published on September 16, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Editorials