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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Stephen Harper"
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The Changing Composition of the Canadian Supreme Court

Earlier this morning, the Supreme Court of Canada announced that Justice Marie Deschamps will retire from the bench on August 7, 2012. She was originally appointed on August 8, 2002. Justice Deschamps will therefore have served ten years on the high court. The coming vacancy will give conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper the opportunity to make his fifth

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Published on May 18, 2012
Author:          Filed under: hp, Richard Albert, Stephen Harper, Supreme Court of Canada
 
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The Conservative Consolidation in Canada

As our colleague Ran Hirschl reported earlier this month, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper recently filled two vacancies on the Supreme Court of Canada. With those two appointments, four is now the total number of Prime Minister Harper’s Supreme Court nominations since he ascended to power in 2006. A few observations occur to me in

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Published on October 30, 2011
Author:          Filed under: hp, Richard Albert, Stephen Harper, Supreme Court of Canada
 
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A Canadian at Guantanamo Bay

Yesterday, the United States Supreme Court denied the request of Omar Khadr to block his military commission trial at Guantanamo Bay. Khadr is a 23 year-old Canadian citizen whose prosecution arises from acts he is alleged to have committed as a 15 year-old in Afghanistan. The Government of Canada, at the direction of Prime Minister Stephen

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Published on August 7, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Omar Khadr, Richard Albert, Stephen Harper, Terrorism; Guantanamo Bay
 
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Supreme Court of Canada v. detention of juveniles at Guantanamo Bay

Today the Supreme Court of Canada heard oral argument in Prime Minister of Canada et al. v. Omar Ahmed Khadr. Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick (a fellow Canadian, if I am not mistaken) has a very nice story about it here. In a nutshell, the Canadian Supreme Court is being asked to clean up the legal mess

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