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Home Archive for category "Richard Albert" (Page 4)
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Competing Models of Democracy in Canada and the United States

A few years ago, Michael Adams illuminated the many ways in which the United States and Canada are hardening in their views on civil society, culture, and politics. Entitled “Fire and Ice,” the book marshals an encyclopedic volume of data to show that Canada retains its own distinct identity—one that remains vibrant and strong despite

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Published on January 25, 2010
Author:          Filed under: campaign finance; election, Canada, hp, Richard Albert, United States
 
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Recent Scholarship on Comparative Constitutional Law

Four recent papers, each one excellent, merit the attention of readers with an interest in comparative constitutional law. The first, Studying Japanese Law Because It’s There, is an essay by Tom Ginsburg, my colleague here at the Comparative Constitutions Blog. Recently published in the American Journal of Comparative Law, this very important paper states in

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“Allah” and “God” in Malaysia

On New Year’s eve, the Malaysian High Court reportedly ruled that the Catholic Church may lawfully use the term “Allah” to refer to “God.” The judgment is not yet available on the High Court’s website but useful reports are available at the Jurist, on the BBC, and in Time Magazine. In the aftermath of the

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Published on January 11, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Malaysia, religion, Richard Albert
 
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Comparative Constitutional Law Events at the 2010 AALS Annual Meeting

I am looking forward to attending the 2010 AALS Annual Meeting, held this year in New Orleans, starting today, January 6, and running until Sunday, January 10. For the convenience of readers, I have taken a moment to look through the program to highlight the comparative constitutional law events on offer at the AALS. All events,

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Published on January 6, 2010
Author:          Filed under: AALS, hp, Richard Albert
 
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Indo-Pakistani Constitutional Convergence?

The distinctions in constitutional structure between India and Pakistan—not to mention their differences in political culture—are as sharp as they are numerous. To name but a few, India is a federal state tending toward decentralization in a parliamentary system whose constitution proclaims its commitment to secular democracy. In contrast, Pakistan is a federal state with

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