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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Reviews" (Page 11)
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Article Review/Response: Robert Leckey on Michèle Finck’s “Role of Human Dignity in Gay Rights Adjudication and Legislation: A Comparative Perspective”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, Robert Leckey reviews Michèle Finck’s article The Role of Human Dignity in Gay Rights Adjudication and Legislation: A Comparative Perspective, which appears in the current issue of I•CON.  Michèle Finck then responds to the review. The full article is available for free here.] Review by Robert Leckey

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Published on May 10, 2016
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Virtual Book Review Roundtable: “Unfit for Democracy” Featuring Stephen Gottlieb, Peter Quint and Dana Schmalz

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this latest edition of our virtual book review roundtable series here at I-CONnect, Peter Quint and Dana Schmalz comment on Stephen Gottlieb’s new book entitled Unfit for Democracy: The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics, published earlier this year by New York University Press. Though it is

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Published on May 6, 2016
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Book Review: Bogdan Iancu on Bianca Selejan-Guțan’s “The Constitution of Romania: A Contextual Analysis”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Bogdan Iancu reviews Bianca Selejan-Guțan’s book on The Constitution of Romania: A Contextual Analysis.] Contextualizing Romania’s Fragmented Constitutionalism —Bogdan Iancu, Associate Professor (Comparative Constitutional Law and Constitutional Theory), University of Bucharest, Faculty of Political Science For a long time after the collapse of state socialism, the countries that had

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Published on April 27, 2016
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Virtual Book Review Roundtable: “Engaging with Social Rights” Featuring Brian Ray, Bernadette Atuahene and Richard Stacey

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School With apologies for the sometimes garbled audio, we are pleased to continue our new virtual book review roundtable series here at I-CONnect. In this series, we host an author and one or more commentators to discuss a recent book in comparative public law. In this latest virtual book review roundtable, Bernadette

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Published on March 12, 2016
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I•CON Debate Review by Nicolás Figueroa: Constituent Power and Constitutional Revolution

[Editor’s Note: In this special installment of I•CONnect’s Review Series, Nicolás Figueroa offers a critical review of the I•CON debate between Mark Tushnet and Jan Komárek on constituent power and constitutional revolution. The debate appears in the current issue of I•CON, beginning with Tushnet’s paper here, followed by a reply by Komárek here, and concluding with a rejoinder from Tushnet here.] Review by

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Published on February 25, 2016
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Book Review: Jaclyn Neo on Kevin Y.L. Tan’s “The Constitution of Singapore: A Contextual Analysis”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jaclyn Neo reviews Kevin Y.L. Tan’s book on The Constitution of Singapore: A Contextual Analysis.] Contextualizing the Singapore Constitutionalist Paradox –Jaclyn L. Neo,* Assistant Professor of Law, National University of Singapore Befitting of his status as one of the foremost legal historians in Singapore, Kevin YL Tan’s masterful introduction to Singapore

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Published on January 8, 2016
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Virtual Book Review Roundtable: “A Theory of Discrimination Law” Featuring Tarun Khaitan, Deborah Hellman and Julie Suk

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School We are pleased to inaugurate a new virtual book review roundtable series at I-CONnect. We will periodically assemble a group of scholars–a couple of reviewers along with the author–to discuss a recent book in comparative public law. In the first installment in this series, Deborah Hellman and Julie Suk comment

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Published on January 6, 2016
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Book Review/Response: Rayner Thwaites and Daniel Wilsher on Indefinite Detention of Non-Citizens

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review/Response Series, Daniel Wilsher reviews Rayner Thwaites’ recent book on The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014). Rayner Thwaites then responds to the review.] Review by Daniel Wilsher –Daniel Wilsher, City University London, reviewing Rayner Thwaites, The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014)

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Published on December 16, 2015
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Article Review: Reijer Passchier on Vicki Jackson’s “The (myth of un)amendability of the US Constitution and the democratic component of constitutionalism”

[Editor’s Note: In this special installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, Reijer Passchier reviews Vicki Jackson‘s article on The (myth of un)amendability of the US Constitution and the democratic component of constitutionalism, which appears in the current issue of I•CON. The full article is available for free here.] Review by Reijer Passchier –Reijer Passchier, PhD Candidate at Leiden

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Published on November 17, 2015
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Article Review: David Bilchitz on Matthias Klatt’s “Positive Rights: Who Decides? Judicial Review in Balance”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, David Bilchitz reviews Matthias Klatt‘s article on Positive Rights: Who Decides? Judicial Review in Balance, which appears in the current issue of I•CON. The full article is available for free here.] —David Bilchitz, University of Johannesburg In most constitutions today, fundamental rights play a central role and they are

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Published on August 26, 2015
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