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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "process"
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The Nepali Process — a Victim of Politics

For most of the past three years Nepal has been hailed as a veritable success for its transition from monarchy to democracy, peace process, interim constitution, elections, and formation of a Constituent Assembly (CA). Now with its government collapsed and a total breakdown in the delivery of basic services to the people, Nepal’s constitution-making process

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Published on May 22, 2009
Author:          Filed under: hp, Jason Gluck, process
 
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Self Dealing and Legislatures

It is often tempting, or at least convenient, to charge sitting legislatures with the task of constitution writing. These bodies are usually representative and are built to write laws. Why not trust them with higher law too? One concern is the problem of self dealing. One of, if not THE most, important tasks in constitution

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Published on February 13, 2009
Author:          Filed under: hp, process, Zachary Elkins
 
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17 years and now…this?

The new Burmese constitutions is extraordinary on many levels. First, is the waiting-for-Godot quality of the process that produced it. It took about seventeen years from initiative to ratification to get the document out the door. That is far and away a record. True, other countries kick around the possibility of a new charter sometimes

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Published on August 3, 2008
Author:          Filed under: hp, process, Zachary Elkins