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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "New Voices" (Page 2)
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Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?”; or (2) “Assume the year is

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Published on February 20, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Call for Papers: 3rd Annual YCC Conference

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPARATIVE LAW  YOUNGER COMPARATIVISTS COMMITTEE CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT The Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law is pleased to invite submissions for its third annual conference, to be held on April 4-5, 2014, at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon.  The purpose of the conference is to highlight, develop,

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Published on October 26, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Federico Fabbrini

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Federico Fabbrini about his forthcoming paper on The Euro-Crisis and the Courts: Judicial Review and the Political Process in Comparative Perspective. In his paper, Professor Fabbrini explores the increasing involvement of courts in the fiscal and economic affairs of the state, with a

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New Scholarship Review: Interview with Vanessa MacDonnell

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In this installment of I-CONnect’s interview series, I speak with Vanessa MacDonnell about her forthcoming paper on The Constitution as Framework for Governance. In her paper, Professor MacDonnell proposes a new way of thinking about the role of government, specifically with regard to its affirmative obligations to advance and secure constitutional

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Published on September 15, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices, Reviews
 
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The Constituent Power of Student Protests in Chile

–Fernando Muñoz León, Assistant Professor, Universidad Austral de Chile 2011 was an important year for social movements and popular protest in liberal democracies. For instance, the United States had the Occupy movement and Spain the Indignados. Chile had its own share in the form of massive student protests that put the government on the ropes

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Published on August 26, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments, New Voices
 
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Egypt: What’s Next?

—Mohamed Abdelaal, Assistant Professor of Constitutional and Administrative Law, Alexandria University, School of Law Was the overthrow of President Mohamed Morsi on June 30 a popular revolution or a military coup? The debate is outdated. What is more important is that the events of June 30 returned Egypt to square one, right back where it

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Published on August 12, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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The Liberty-Equality Debate: Comparing the Lawrence and Naz Foundation Rulings

Cross-posted with  permission from the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog. —Ajey Sangai, Research Associate, Jindal Global Law School Last month marked the 10-year anniversary of Lawrence v. Texas, where the United States Supreme Court ruled that laws that criminalized sodomy were unconstitutional. Like June 26 2013, June 26 2003, was also a historic day for the LGBT

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Published on August 8, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Why Entrench Formal Amendment Rules?

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Constitutional changes, both big and small, are underway in Egypt, Fiji, Tunisia and elsewhere. Constitutional designers in these and other countries face daunting challenges in dividing powers between governmental branches, balancing state prerogatives with individual rights, and managing majority-minority relations. Constitutional designers should also be particularly attentive to their

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Published on August 5, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Indonesian Constitutional Court Reconsiders Blasphemy Law

–Dr. Melissa Crouch, Postdoctoral Fellow, Law Faculty, National University of Singapore In 2012, a new case challenging the constitutionality of Indonesia’s Blasphemy Law was lodged with the Constitutional Court.[1] Since Indonesia’s transition to democracy, over 150 individuals from minority religious groups have been convicted of blasphemy. The Blasphemy Law in Indonesia confers power on the

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Published on July 30, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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A Theory of Informal Constitutional Change in International Organizations

— Julian Arato, J.D., LL.M., NYU School of Law My thanks to Tom Ginsburg, Richard Albert, and David Landau for the opportunity to talk about my work on informal constitutional change in international organizations (IO’s) – a process sometimes called constitutional transformation, by contrast to formal constitutional amendment.  I’ll first describe my broader project, and

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Published on January 23, 2013
Author:          Filed under: New Voices