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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Julio Rios-Figueroa"
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A Forthcoming Rights Revolution in Mexico?

Two important constitutional reforms have been just approved in Mexico. The first reform transforms the human rights regime in the country. Among other things, it recognizes as rights not only those explicitly included in the constitution but also all rights present in international treaties ratified by the country. The reform also gives new powers to

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Published on June 3, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America, Mexico
 
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Constitutional Reforms in Ecuador

Tomorrow, Saturday May 7th 2011, Ecuadorean citizens will vote on a referendum to change their constitution. They will vote ‘yes’ or ‘no’ on ten questions proposed by President Rafael Correa. Positive answers to the first five questions imply an automatic constitutional amendment, whereas positive answers to the rest of the questions would mandate the national

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Published on May 6, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, Ecuador, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America
 
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Amending the Unamendable Constitutional Clauses in Honduras?

The Honduran congress has passed, by the required supermajority, a reform to constitutional Article 5 that refers to the requisites to call for a plebiscite or a referendum as well as to the scope of issues that can be decided using those mechanisms of direct democracy. In order to successfully amend Article 5, however, a

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Published on January 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional review, honduras, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America
 
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Supreme Court Presidents: Administrative or Jurisprudential Influence?

The justices of the Mexican Supreme Court (MSC) have just elected, as they do every four years, a new president. Whereas the President of the US Supreme Court can exert considerable jurisprudential influence (with, for instance, its power to assign cases to fellow justices), the president of the MSC wields considerable influence over the administration

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Published on January 5, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional design, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Mexico, Supreme Court justices
 
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War on Drugs and Due Process in Mexico

A few days ago, a federal judge in Mexico ordered the release of a group of local government officials from the state of Michoacán (some of them elected, others appointed) that the office of the Mexican Attorney General (Procurador General in Spanish) accused of having links with the organized crime. The judge considered that prosecutorial

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Published on October 8, 2010
Author:          Filed under: due process, hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Mexico
 
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Enacting Constitutionalism

For readers who might be interested in a paper on the constitutional enactment of independent judicial institutions, may I suggest a paper just published entitled “Enacting Constitutionalism,” in which my coauthor and I focus on the political composition of the constituent body and its implications for the type of institutions enacted. The paper is available

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Transitional Justice in Latin America: Recent Developments

Last Tuesday April 20, a federal court in Argentina sentenced former president Reynaldo Bignone to 25 years in prison for human rights abuses during the 1976-1983 “dirty war”. The Court also sentenced five other retired military officers to prison terms ranging from 17 to 25 years in connection with abuses during the military regime. These

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Published on April 23, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America, transitional justice
 
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Colombian Judges Stop Álvaro Uribe’s Reelection Plans

Back in 2005, in a 7-2 decision, the Colombian Constitutional Court decided to uphold the constitutional amendment that allowed current president, Álvaro Uribe, to be reelected. Today, also in a 7-2 decision, the Colombian Constitutional Court decided that it won’t take place the referendum that would have given to voters the last word on whether

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Published on February 27, 2010
Author:          Filed under: hp, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America, term limits
 
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“Decolonizing” Justice in Bolivia?

President Evo Morales and his party MAS (Movimiento al Socialismo -Movement Towards Socialism) retained the presidency and won a comfortable supermajority in both chambers of Congress in the elections held last December 6, 2009. The consequences of that unquestionable triumph are beginning to be felt in Bolivia. A law passed last week, as several news

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Published on February 21, 2010
Author:          Filed under: Bolivia, hp, judicial appointments, Julio Rios-Figueroa, Latin America
 
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A New Constitution in the Dominican Republic

The process of constitutional change in the Dominican Republic, which I mentioned in a previous post, has successfully come to an end. On January 26th, after a long, thorough, and civil process (characteristics that have been conspicuously absent in the region’s recent wave of “constitutional revolutions” in Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador) a new constitution was promulgated

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