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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "hp"
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Pakistan Supreme Court proceedings against former President Zardari; Philippines Supreme Court and cyberspeech

–David Law, Washington University, St. Louis A couple of constitutional court news items … — The Pakistan Supreme Court and government of Pakistan appear to be finally moving toward resolution of the Court’s efforts to quash the amnesty granted to former President Zardari and others.  The Court is attempting to clear the way for Swiss

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Published on October 10, 2012
Author:          Filed under: cyberspeech, David Law, hp, Pakistan, Philippines, Switzerland
 
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Fatherland, Socialism or Death

–Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez Yesterday a new article of mine came out in Foreign Policy on some of the possible contingencies  for the upcoming Venezuelan Elections. An earlier version of the piece, which the FP editors felt may be a bit too legalistic and technical for their purposes, was just the sort of thing which I suspect

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Venezuelan Elections/FP

I recently did an analysis on the upcoming Venezuelan elections for Foreign Policy. Although some interesting observations on the possible effects of constitutionally mandated voter participation laws failed to make it past the cutting room floor, I suspect it may still be of interest to the readers of this blog. “Even within a region justly

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Published on September 26, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, election, hp, venezuela
 
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Pussy Riot: when “disproportionate” is inappropriate

Shortly after a Moscow court sentenced the three female rock musicians from Pussy Riot to two years in a penal colony for ‘hooliganism,’ the United States Embassy in Russia sent off the following disapproving tweet: “Today’s verdict in the Pussy Riot case looks disproportionate.” While any official criticism of this latest Muscovite miscarriage of justice

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Uganda at 50 and the problem of “sham constitutions”

Today’s Sunday Monitor features a stinging but unsurprising assessment of the state of Uganda’s 1995 constitution by Busingye Kabumba, who teaches constitutional law at Makerere University in Kampala.  The title says it all: “The 1995 Uganda Constitution is nothing but an illusory law.”  Kabumba characterizes the Ugandan constitution as “an elaborate farce that is cynically perpetrated by

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Published on September 24, 2012
Author:          Filed under: David Law, hp, Mila Versteeg, sham constitutions, Sudan, Uganda, Zimbabwe
 
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The German Constitutional Court and Europe

[By Russell Miller, Professor of Law at Washington & Lee University, co-author of the forthcoming The Constitutional Jurisprudence of the Federal Republic of Germany (3d ed. 2012)] On 12 September 2012 the German Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) is set to announce its ruling on requests for temporary injunctions that would keep President Gauck from giving his

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Published on September 5, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Europe, German Constitutional Court, hp
 
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Keeping up with the Obiangs: Theft and Hereditary Succession in Dictatorships

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term “kleptocracy” was first introduced into the English language in 1819 as a contemporary criticism of the Imperial Spanish Government. Perhaps it is fitting then that the leadership of tiny Equatorial Guinea – one of Spain’s former colonies – is doing so much to keep this particular colonial

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Why Japan should amend its war-renouncing Article 9

[By Craig Martin, reprinted from the Japan Times, Aug. 4, 2012] The pressure is mounting to either amend Article 9, the war-renouncing provision of Japan’s Constitution, or to increasingly disregard it and so make it irrelevant. In April the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) published its proposal for amending the Constitution, and the dangers it posed

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Published on August 14, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Craig Martin, hp, Japan
 
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A New Test for the Romanian Constitutional Court

Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University The Romanian Constitutional Court has played a key role in blocking the efforts by the new government of Prime Minister Victor Ponta to bring all institutions of state under the control of his governing coalition.  At the moment, the Court is under extreme pressure to certify last week’s referendum results,

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Published on August 8, 2012
Author:          Filed under: hp, Romania
 
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How to Evade the Constitution: The Case of the Hungarian Constitutional Court’s Decision on the Judicial Retirement Age

Kim Lane Scheppele, Princeton University On Monday 16 July, the Hungarian Constitutional Court handed down its biggest decision of the year.   It held that the sudden lowering of the retirement age for judges is unconstitutional because it gave the judges no time to prepare for the change and because it created an unclear framework in

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Published on August 8, 2012
Author:          Filed under: hp, Hungary, kim lane scheppele