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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "France"
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Keeping up with the Obiangs: Theft and Hereditary Succession in Dictatorships

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term “kleptocracy” was first introduced into the English language in 1819 as a contemporary criticism of the Imperial Spanish Government. Perhaps it is fitting then that the leadership of tiny Equatorial Guinea – one of Spain’s former colonies – is doing so much to keep this particular colonial

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When to Overthrow Your Government: The Right to Resist in the World’s Constitutions

Tom Ginsburg, Mila Versteeg and myself have just posted the preliminary version our upcoming article on the Right to Rebel within the world’s written constitutions unto SSRN. The article, which is available for download here, may well be of interest to our fellow scholars, bloggers and constitutional enthusiasts.  We would certainly welcome any comments, perspectives

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French Court Affirms Ban on Gay Marriage

Yesterday, the French Constitutional Council upheld a law prohibiting gay marriage. The ruling appears to be as much about the institutional relationship between courts and legislatures in France as it is about marriage itself. In its short decision, the Constitutional Council made two points of note. First, the bundle of family rights preserved in the

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Published on January 29, 2011
Author:          Filed under: France, gay marriage, hp, Richard Albert