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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Keeping up with the Obiangs: Theft and Hereditary Succession in Dictatorships

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term “kleptocracy” was first introduced into the English language in 1819 as a contemporary criticism of the Imperial Spanish Government. Perhaps it is fitting then that the leadership of tiny Equatorial Guinea – one of Spain’s former colonies – is doing so much to keep this particular colonial

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Equatorial Guinea heads to polls

Citizens of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea went to the polls today to vote in a referendum on a new constitution. Changes include the imposition of term limits on the president (two seven-year terms in office); the creation of a vice-presidency and Senate; the establishment of economic policy and auditing watchdogs; and an ombudsman. Opponents charge that

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Published on November 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: equatorial guinea, hp, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Voting underway in Equatorial Guinea

Citizens of oil-rich Equatorial Guinea went to the polls today to vote in a referendum on a new constitution. Changes include the imposition of term limits on the president (two seven-year terms in office); the creation of a vice-presidency and Senate; the establishment of economic policy and auditing watchdogs; and an ombudsman. Opponents charge that

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Published on November 14, 2011
Author:          Filed under: equatorial guinea, hp, Tom Ginsburg