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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Egypt" (Page 2)
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From Cairo: Kristen Stilt on Assessing Tahrir’s First Ballot Box

[cross-posted from Foreignpolicy.com] The need to establish stability during a period of great uncertainty was a central issue in Egypt’s constitutional amendment referendum held on March 19. Advocates of a “yes” vote championed an immediate path to political, economic, and social stability through amendments to the most offensive provisions of the constitution, which would be

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Published on March 22, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, Egypt, hp
 
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Dispatch from Cairo: What the Egyptian Constitutional Amendment Referendum is Really About

Many Egyptians are intensely debating the pros and cons of the constitutional amendment referendum taking place here in Egypt on Saturday, March 19, but in these discussions, what would seem to be the most obvious topic is almost completely missing: the content of the amendments themselves. By and large, what the amendments actually purport to

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Published on March 19, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, Egypt, hp, Kristen Stilt
 
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Arato on The Return of Revolutions

We certainly said good-bye to revolutions too soon, between 1989 and 1995. Yes, we were right Romania was the exception, and the series of changes of regime certainly did not represent revolutions. Yet the fact that the latter were represented finally and definitively by the journalistic cliche as the „Revolutions of 1989” demonstrates the tremendous

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Published on March 7, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Andrew Arato, Egypt, hp
 
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Egypt: Parliament to the Rescue

Egypt’s military has begun to commandeer its revolution. Its handpicked commission of legal experts has come up with recommendations for patching up the existing constitution to suit the post-Mubarak era. These top-down reforms have been generated within the space of 10 days and without broad popular participation. They would open up presidential elections to independent

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Published on March 3, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Bruce Ackerman, Egypt, hp
 
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Recent Commentary on the Proposed Amendments to the Egyptian Constitution

Recently, Tom Ginsburg described in this blog some of the proposed constitutional amendments for the Egyptian Constitution and flagged Tamir Moustafa’s brief analysis of them in foreign policy. It is also worth drawing people’s attention to commentary by two other commentators with long experience watching Egyptian constitutional developments. Each has just today posted interesting thoughts

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Egypt’s amendments announced

Egypt’s eight-member committee charged with drafting constitutional amendments has announced their proposals. Originally tasked with modifying six provisions, they instead called for eight amendments. [An excellent discussion of the issues at stake, featuring our contributor Tamir Moustafa, can be found here. and his analysis of the amendments is here.] As reported in the press, the

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Published on February 28, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Egypt, hp, Tamir Moustafa, term limits, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Amending the Egyptian Constitution: Six critical articles that test the military’s commitment to democracy

The most important announcement last week from the Egyptian Supreme Council of the Armed Forces was that it had appointed a committee to amend the Egyptian Constitution. The committee, chaired by retired judge Tariq al-Bishri, was tasked to draft constitutional amendments within 10 days, followed by a national referendum on the proposed amendments within two

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Published on February 22, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Egypt, hp, Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt, Tamir Moustafa
 
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Suharto and Mubarak’s Final Days: Similar Trajectories Leading to Very Different Modes of Transition

On The New Republic’s website on February 2, 2011, Thomas Carothers suggested that those leading the Egyptian transition might want to draw some lessons from the experience of Indonesia. He notes several aspects of the Indonesian transition from the regime of Suharto to a new regime that, he believes, helped Indonesia achieve what was, in

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Published on February 13, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Clark Lombardi, constitutional change, coup, Egypt, Indonesia
 
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Andrew Arato on “Egypt’s Transformation: Revolution, Coup, Regime Change, or All of the above?”

Andrew Arato has kindly contributed the following post: “Egypt’s Transformation: Revolution, Coup, Regime Change, or All of the above?”: Among those who believe that in the modern world democracy is a universal value, all have been inspired, amazed and totally convinced by the Egyptian democratic movement. It has accomplished the country’s liberation from its gerontocratic,

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Published on February 12, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Clark Lombardi, constitutional politics, coup, Egypt, emergency powers
 
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The Constitutional Right to Rebel – advice for Egypt?

The ripple effects from Tunisia’s “Jasmine Revolution” are still making themselves felt throughout the Arab World. Earlier today, Egypt’s Mubarak stepped down after weathering large-scale protests and civil disobedience for over two weeks. Elsewhere in the region Lebanon, Algeria, Yemen, Jordan (and to a lesser extent Mauritania, Sudan, Syria, Libya, and Morocco) have also seen

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Published on February 11, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional design, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Egypt, Tunisia