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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Developments" (Page 86)
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Will Democracy and Constitutionalism Mix in Myanmar?

—Dominic J Nardi, Jr, University of Michigan Department of Political Science Myanmar’s[1] constitution – adopted after a controversial referendum in May 2008 – created the country’s first constitutional court in half a century. Initially, few if any observers believed the Constitutional Tribunal would play a significant role. However, within a few months, the tribunal seemed to be

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Published on October 24, 2012
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The Latest Decision on Malapportionment in Japan

–Tokujin MATSUDAIRA, Teikyo University On October 17, 2012, the Japanese Supreme Court released a judgment from the grand bench regarding the constitutionality of the 2010 election of Sangiin (House of Councillors). In that election, the ruling DPP failed to keep its majority in the upper house, launching a period of political chaos. Plaintiffs had argued

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Published on October 21, 2012
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Iceland referendum headed for victory

–Tom Ginsburg With two-thirds of the votes counted, it appears that Iceland’s citizen-drafted proposal for constitutional reform is headed for victory. Roughly half of eligible voters turned out for the referendum, which asked voters to consider six different questions covering key aspects of the proposed new Constitution.  The draft included an expanded set of citizen

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Published on October 21, 2012
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The Travails of an Enfeebled Parliament: The Swazi House of Assembly Reverses a Vote of No Confidence in the Cabinet

–Laura-Stella Enonchong, University of Warwick, African Network of Constitutional Lawyers  On 03 October 2012, the House of Assembly of the Kingdom of Swaziland, which has often been regarded as an enfeebled institution, passed a historic vote of no confidence in the Cabinet. According to the Swazi Constitution (arts. 68(5) & 134(5)(b) the Prime Minister (PM)

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Published on October 19, 2012
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Thoughts on the German Constitutional Court Decision on the ESM

–Richard Stith, Valparaiso University The German Federal Constitutional Court’s decision of September 12, 2012, has been welcomed by some as signaling yet another political retreat, yet another ”Son of Solange II”. But what should bring joy to the heart of every American comparative law teacher is that, whether retreat or advance, every new “red line” drawn

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Published on October 18, 2012
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Venezuela’s Exit from the Inter-American Court

—Alexandra Huneeus, University of Wisconsin   Hugo Chavez’s election victory last Sunday bodes badly for the Organization of American States’ Human Rights System.  On September 10, 2012, Venezuela denounced the American Convention of Human Rights so as to remove itself from the oversight of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights .  Chavez’s challenger had promised

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Published on October 15, 2012
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Venezuela’s Denunciation of the American Convention on Human Rights: A Natural Step for an Illiberal Democracy

–Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile A few weeks ago, on September 6th, the government of Venezuela denounced the American Convention on Human Rights.[1] According to the procedure set by Article 78.1 of the latter, within a year of this official notification Venezuela will no longer be part of this treaty, and thus no longer

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Published on October 15, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments, Javier Couso, venezuela