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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "constitutional interpretation"
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Comparative Originalism

Thank you to Tom for noting my book review! I did want to add one thing: The issue of how the courts of other countries interpret their constitutions is relatively understudied. There is a good book with single-country studies from 2007 edited by Jeffrey Goldsworthy (Monash University, Australia). I have a reply forthcoming in the

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Published on October 7, 2010
Author:          Filed under: constitutional interpretation, David Fontana, hp, originalism
 
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The Iraq Judiary: A Correction and Apology

I feel compelled to update my March 31 post about the Iraq Federal Supreme Court’s recent ruling on the meaning of “largest Council of Representatives bloc” in Article 76 of the Iraq Constitution. I maligned the Court for ruling that the phrase referred to post-election coalitions (multiple party lists that come together to form a

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A Step Backwards for the Iraq Judiciary

The Iraq judiciary has made great strides in its capacity and independence since the fall of the Saddam regime, as demonstrated by brave and politically unpopular decisions made in the name of fair and impartial adjudication. In 2008 the Iraq Supreme Court vacated the Council of Representative’s decision to strip a parliamentarian’s immunity so he

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Indo-Pakistani Constitutional Convergence?

The distinctions in constitutional structure between India and Pakistan—not to mention their differences in political culture—are as sharp as they are numerous. To name but a few, India is a federal state tending toward decentralization in a parliamentary system whose constitution proclaims its commitment to secular democracy. In contrast, Pakistan is a federal state with

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The Church and Constitutional Fidelity

Nearly a month ago, the Wall Street Journal carried an interesting story on the role of the Catholic Church in the Honduran constitutional crisis. The Church, as it turns out, supported the coup (a highly contested word in this context, I know) for which they received a fair amount of criticism from Zelayistas. In the

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Published on December 14, 2009
Author:          Filed under: constitutional interpretation, honduras, hp, religion, Zachary Elkins