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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis" (Page 5)
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Special Symposium on “Towering Judges”—Jointly Hosted at I-CONnect and IACL-IADC Blog—Introduction: Towering Judges in Comparative Perspective

[Editor’s Note: We are delighted to co-host a special online symposium on the concept of a “towering judge.” This symposium—hosted jointly for the first time both here at I-CONnect and at the IACL-AIDC Blog—emerges from a conference held earlier this year at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, organized by Professors Rehan Abeyratne (CUHK) and Iddo

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Published on March 4, 2019
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Constitutional Dialogues and Abortion Law Reform in Argentina: What’s Next?

—Paola Bergallo, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina [Editor’s note: This is one of our I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four

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Published on February 27, 2019
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I-CONnect Symposium on “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal”–Part IV–Stemming the Tide During the Crisis in Spain: Fiscal Rules and Regional Finances

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth and final entry in our symposium on the “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here, Part II is available here, and Part III is available here.] –Violeta Ruiz Almendral, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid The debt and

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Published on February 23, 2019
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I-CONnect Symposium on “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal”–Part III–Crisis and Tax Reforms in Greece: Towards Judicial Empowerment as a Means to Overcome Administrative Deficiencies

[Editor’s Note: This is the third entry in our symposium on the “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here, and Part II is available here.] —Stylianos-Ioannis Koutnatzis, Democritus University of Thrace, Law School; and Georgios Dimitropoulos, HBKU College of Law & Public Policy

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Published on February 22, 2019
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I-CONnect Symposium on “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal”–Part II: Budgetary Procedures under the Irish Constitution

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in our symposium on the “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal.” The introduction to the symposium is available here and Part I is available here.] –Ailbhe O’Neill, Trinity College Dublin Collins v. Minister for Finance [2016] IESC 73 required the Irish Supreme Court to explore for the first

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Published on February 21, 2019
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I-CONnect Symposium on “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal”–Part I: The Eurozone Crisis and the Rise of the Portuguese Constitutional Court

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in our symposium on the “The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] –Teresa Violante, Goethe University Frankfurt and Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law The story of how the Eurozone crisis was particularly harsh on Portugal is well

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Published on February 20, 2019
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I-CONnect Symposium–The Euro-Crisis Ten Years Later: A Constitutional Appraisal–Introduction

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a one-week symposium on the 10-year anniversary of the Euro crisis. We are grateful to our conveners–Professors Pietro Faraguna, Cristina Fasone, and Diletta Tega–for assembling a diverse group of scholars to explore this important moment in European history.] —Pietro Faraguna, University of Trieste; Cristina Fasone, University of Rome «LUISS

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Published on February 19, 2019
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Constitutional Retrogression in Indonesia

–Abdurrachman Satrio, Researcher at the Center for State Policy Studies, Faculty of Law, Padjadjaran University Constitutional retrogression, as defined by Aziz Huq and Tom Ginsburg, occurs when democratically elected rulers use formal legal measures to undermine democracy gradually.[1] In this post, I will argue that Indonesia – the most stable democratic country in Southeast Asia

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Published on February 15, 2019
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Russia’s Contested Constitutional Review

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on February 13, 2019
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The Courts Respond to Executive Tyranny in Sri Lanka

–Mario Gomez, Executive Director, International Centre for Ethnic Studies (Sri Lanka); previously Lecturer at the University of Colombo The final three months of 2018 were challenging times for constitutional resilience and order in Sri Lanka. Almost four years since the peaceful political transition of 2015, the country plunged into a constitutional crisis when President Sirisena

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Published on January 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis