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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis" (Page 37)
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The Keith Project

–Juliet Bull, Victoria University of Wellington   Sir Kenneth Keith, ONZ, KBE, QC is a renowned New Zealand Judge currently serving a nine-year term on the bench of the International Court of Justice. The “Keith Project” is a Victoria University of Wellington initiative which will provide access to Sir Kenneth’s extensive body of extra-judicial writing.

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Published on June 5, 2013
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The British American Colonies and Comparative Subnational Constitutionalism

—Scott Douglas Gerber, Professor of Law, Ohio Northern University My most recent academic book is A Distinct Judicial Power:  The Origins of an Independent Judiciary, 1606-1787 (Oxford University Press, 2011).[1]  That book is the first comprehensive analysis of the origins of judicial independence in the United States.  Part I examines the political theory of an

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Published on May 26, 2013
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Showing Germans the Light

–Or Bassok, Tikvah Scholar, NYU School of Law Conferences in the US on German public law often digress into an attempt by Americans scholars to show their German counterparts the scholarly “light.” The recipe has several variations.[1] According to the milder version, German public law scholarship fails to give an adequate account of reality when it

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Published on May 22, 2013
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Is Turkey in the process of adopting a new constitution or a large scale constitutional amendment? Some questions concerning constitutional theory

–Ali Acar, PhD Student at European University Institute  [ali.acar@eui.eu ] Turkey is currently undergoing a process of drafting a new constitution. The lack of legitimacy of the present, 1982, constitution, which was originated from the 1980 military coup d’état, renders adoption of a new contitution necessary in the public opinion. There are high public expectations for

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Published on May 13, 2013
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Egypt’s Constitution: The Religious Pot

–Mohamed Abdelaal, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Alexandria University School of Law Immediately after the Egyptian Revolution in 2011, which ended thirty years of repression and dictatorship under the regime of former President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians faced the serious challenge of electing a new president and building a new Egypt. Amidst these

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Published on May 2, 2013
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Marry me or tax me? That is the constitutional question

—Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire), LL.M. in American Law (Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law) To marry or tax me. This could be the modern Shakespeare quote heard in the oral arguments last March 27th at the US Supreme Court in the pending case Windsor v. United States. But it is more about a

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Published on April 29, 2013
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Four Models of Politicized Judicial Selection

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Judges on national courts of last resort are generally appointed in politicized processes. Judicial selection is politicized when the choice rests on popular consent mediated in some way through elected representatives. We can identify four major models of politicized judicial selection in constitutional states: (1) executive unilateral appointment; (2)

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Published on April 21, 2013
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Socioeconomic Rights and Constitutional Legitimacy in India

—Rehan Abeyratne, Jindal Global Law School In a forthcoming article, I examine socioeconomic rights in the Indian Constitution and the increasingly central role the Supreme Court plays in their enforcement. As Nilesh Sinha recently noted on this blog, India’s judicial independence has allowed the Court to secure broad socioeconomic justice, despite allegations of corruption and

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Published on April 11, 2013
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How Precedent Travels

–Sam Halabi, University of Tulsa In a recent Article forthcoming in the Notre Dame Journal of International and Comparative Law, “Constitutional Borrowing as Jurisprudential and Political Doctrine in Shri DK Basu v. State of West Bengal”, I explore one aspect of the countermajoritarian difficulty engendered by use of foreign precedent.  Usually, that concern is articulated

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Published on April 4, 2013
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The Constitutional Future of Venezuela

—David Landau, FSU College of Law Hugo Chavez’s death poses important questions about the constitutional future of a country that many political analysts have seen as a hybrid or competitive authoritarian regime – that is, somewhere between pure democracy and dictatorship. These regimes have elections, and real elections, but the playing field is highly uneven

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Published on March 31, 2013
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