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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis" (Page 36)
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Of Generals, Judges, and Constitutional Democracies

—Menaka Guruswamy, International Visiting Associate Professor of Law, Columbia University (Fall 2013) Cross-posted from the Blog of the UK Constitutional Law Group On July 3, General Fattah al-Sisi, the 58 year old Chief of the Egyptian Army announced on television that the army had removed President Mohammad Morsi from power and suspended the constitution. In

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Published on July 25, 2013
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How the financial crisis has affected constitutions

–Dr. Alkmene Fotiadou, Centre for European Constitutional Law (Athens, Greece) In the comparative chapter of the book Constitutions in the Global Financial Crisis by Xenophon Contiades (ed.), we attempted to trace how the financial crisis impacted formal and informal constitutional change based on data and analysis provided in the book by constitutional scholars from Greece,

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Published on July 22, 2013
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The Constitutionalism Debate in China

—Rogier Creemers, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford Cross-posted from the Blog of the UK Constitutional Law Group Over the past few months, a heated debate about the role of the Constitution in Chinese political life has emerged. This debate comes in the wake of the 18th Party Congress and

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Published on July 17, 2013
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One Year After: How the Romanian Constitutional Court Changed its Mind

–Bianca Selejan-Guţan, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Simion Bărnuţiu Faculty of Law July 2012 was the scene of the most important constitutional crisis in Romania since December 1989. I explored some salient aspects of the crisis in an earlier post on this blog. One year after these events, the constitutional amendment process, initiated by the Parliament in

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Published on July 14, 2013
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Facing l’etat d’exception: The Greek Crisis Jurisprudence

—Christina M. Akrivopoulou, Adjunct Lecturer, Democritus University of Thrace Greek courts have only recently attempted to control the Memoranda entered into between the Greek state and the European Union and IMF, which impose austerity measures on the country. This judicial self-restraint has mainly been due to the extreme severity of the financial crisis. In theory,

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Published on July 11, 2013
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Constitutional Writs as “Weapons” in Myanmar?

—Dr. Melissa Crouch, Postdoctoral Fellow, Law Faculty, National University of Singapore In 2011, Myanmar began its transition to democracy under a civilian-military led government. The process has taken place within the framework of the 2008 Constitution and it has been followed by a range of legal and institutional reforms. One of the important features of

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Published on July 9, 2013
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Says Who?

—Claudia E. Haupt, Associate-in-Law, Columbia Law School Cross-posted from the Center for Law and Religion Forum at St. John’s University School of Law Just in time for my post on symbols, the New York Times picks up the topic as well. So this is page A1 news! Of course, the underlying issue—the treatment of religious

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Published on June 23, 2013
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A partial supranational solution to the problem of regressive constitutional amendments

–Adem Kessie Abebe, University of Pretoria, South Africa With the significant reduction in the number of coup d’états, one major constitutional crisis facing countries in Africa and beyond is the enactment of regressive constitutional amendments, amendments that are intended to reinforce the powers of incumbents or otherwise weaken vertical and horizontal accountability mechanisms. The problem of

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Published on June 20, 2013
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Petersen on the use of social sciences in constitutional adjudication

In I·CON’s latest issue, Niels Petersen discusses the role of empirical assumptions in constitutional adjudication, and evaluates different strategies for using social science evidence. We have made this article freely available to I·CONnect readers, and we invite you to join the discussion of this important topic. Click on the title to access the full-text paper: Niels Petersen,

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Published on June 19, 2013
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A Coat of Many Colors

—Claudia E. Haupt, Associate-in-Law, Columbia Law School Cross-posted from the Center for Law and Religion Forum at St. John’s University School of Law In this post, I want to pick up some of the themes I alluded to in my first post and respond to Marc’s observations here and Mark’s observations here. The title of this

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Published on June 15, 2013
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