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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis" (Page 3)
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One Step Forward, Two Steps Back? Constructive res judicata in Malaysian Constitutional Cases

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students LL.B. Student Contribution –Shukri Ahmad Shahizam, LL.B. Candidate, London School of Economics In a long-awaited judgement with large ramifications on cases throughout the country the apex court in Malaysia, the Federal Court, has thrown a spanner into the works of constitutional challenges against restrictions on fundamental freedoms. Mat

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Published on February 3, 2018
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Crisis and its Opposite: A Reminiscence of Same-Sex Marriage’s Most Successful Year (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on January 31, 2018
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Symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case”—Born is the King: The Day When Effective Judicial Review Arrived

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth and final entry in our symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here, Part II is available here and Part III is available here.] —Tomáš Ľalík, Associate Professor at the Comenius University in Bratislava Father Christmas or Ježiško (the

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Published on January 27, 2018
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Symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case”—Perplexities of the Appointment Process Resolved by Means of “Fire and Fury”

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth of five parts in our symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, Part I is available here and Part II is available here.] —Kamil Baraník, Assistant Professor of Law, Comenius University in Bratislava With the decision I. ÚS 575/2016, the I. Senate of

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Published on January 26, 2018
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Symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case”—The President’s Appointments

[Editor’s Note: This is the third of five parts in our symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, and Part I is available here.] —Marek Domin, Associate Professor at the Comenius University in Bratislava The decision of the Constitutional Court (CC) of the Slovak Republic – I. ÚS

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Published on January 25, 2018
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Symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case”–Intermezzo to the Constitutional Conflict in Slovakia: A Case Critique

[Editor’s Note: This is the second of five parts in our symposium on “The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case.” The introduction to the symposium is available here.] —Simon Drugda, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford On December 6 the first Senate of the Slovak Constitutional Court (CC) held that President Andrej Kiska infringed rights of the

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Published on January 24, 2018
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Introduction to I-CONnect Symposium: The Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a special symposium on the recent Slovak Constitutional Court Appointments Case. The symposium will feature five parts, including this introduction. We are grateful to Simon Drugda for partnering with us to organize this symposium.] —Simon Drugda, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford Late last year, on December 6, the Constitutional

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Published on January 23, 2018
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Crosspost: Is the GOP Tax Law Unconstitutional?

[Editor’s Note: This piece originally appeared here in the San Francisco Chronicle on December 21, 2017.] —Stephen Gardbaum, UCLA School of Law; Member of the ICON-S Governing Council Now that the Republican tax bill is law, is the matter settled, at least until November or, more likely, 2020? Not necessarily, because the courts may yet

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Published on January 2, 2018
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Independence Referenda Through the Prism of Kurdistan (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on December 27, 2017
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Special Undergraduate Series–Seventy Years of Accession: Reflections on Article 370 of the Indian Constitution

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students LL.B. Student Contribution —Zaid Deva, Candidate for B.A/LL.B (Hons.), Gujarat National Law University, India; Founding Editor, Indian Journal of Constitutional & Administrative Law Article 370, as the House will remember, is a part of certain transitional provisional arrangements. It is not a permanent part of the constitution. As

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Published on December 27, 2017
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