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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis" (Page 29)
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The Metastasis of “National Security” in China

–Alvin Y.H. Cheung, Progressive Lawyers’ Group, Hong Kong As Dwight D. Eisenhower observed as early as 1961, national security is big business–and, if left to its own devices, will accumulate political power, with potentially disastrous consequences.  Recent events in China have yet again confirmed Eisenhower’s insights.  The mass arrests and disappearances of Mainland lawyers, official

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Published on August 6, 2015
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Europeanizing the Eurozone

—Tomas Dumbrovsky, J.S.D. Candidate at the Yale Law School and Assistant Professor at Charles University in Prague. The way the Greek debt crisis was handled in the last weeks has been a public relations nightmare. The more or less rational debate about different economic and political views has succumbed to the irrationality of harmed feelings, humiliation,

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Published on July 31, 2015
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The Jokowi Presidency so Far: Increasing Disregard of Indonesian Constitutionalism?

—Stefanus Hendrianto, Santa Clara University School of Law It is still fresh in our memory that the election of President Joko Widodo in 2014 was hailed internationally. Here was a down to earth politician who seemed to do a credible job in his short term as governor of Jakarta. After nine months in office, Jokowi,

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Published on July 24, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Uncategorized
 
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The Right to Vote of Hungarian Citizens Living Abroad

—Eszter Bodnár, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary Péter and Pál were neighbors in Luxembourg. Péter was member of the Hungarian minority in Romania and arrived in Luxembourg in 2008 to work there at an international company. Due to the favorable new rules, he obtained Hungarian citizenship in 2010. Pál got a one-year contract at the

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Published on July 14, 2015
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The US Same-Sex Marriage Decision: Unconstitutional Constitutional Change?

—Mikołaj Barczentewicz, DPhil in Law Candidate, University of Oxford Much will be written about Obergefell v Hodges, the momentous decision of the US Supreme Court endorsing a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, but in this short blog post I will limit myself to one aspect of the judgment: does it constitute unconstitutional constitutional change? It

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Published on July 8, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Hasebe Yasuo Interview with the Kochi Shimbun

As many readers know, there is a significant debate going on in Japan today about the government’s proposal to pass a new law that would allow for collective self-defense in the event of armed attack. This has led to protests and conflict.  The issue concerns Article Nine of the Constitution, which famously prohibits the maintenance

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Published on June 30, 2015
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Westminster in the Caribbean: The Problem of Prime Ministerial Patronage

—Dr. Derek O’Brien, Reader in Law, Oxford Brookes University St Kitts and Nevis is the smallest federation in the world. Even by Commonwealth Caribbean standards it is tiny, with a population of just over 50,000 and a combined land mass of just over 100 square miles. Yet the events leading up to and immediately following

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Published on June 26, 2015
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Why Codify?

—Adam Perry, Lecturer in Law, Queen Mary University of London Britain is always tinkering with its constitution. Sometimes it talks about a more radical change: constitutional codification. Over the past few years, talk of constitutional codification has grown a little more serious. High-profile committees, centres, and scholars have spent a lot of time and energy discussing

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Published on June 24, 2015
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Constitutional Politics of Institutions: The Call for a British Constitution

—Susan M. Sterett, Virginia Tech A written constitution for Britain is even making the American news again, inspired not least by the debates about independence, with the anniversary of the Magna Carta adding continuity and contrast.[1]  American news describes the call for a written constitution as a response to immediate problems.  British constitutionalism is as much

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Published on June 23, 2015
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The Constitution-Making Process in Chile: A Cautionary Tale from Turkey

—Claudia Heiss, Universidad de Chile & Oya Yegen, Boston University On April 21, President Michelle Bachelet of Chile delivered the second public address to Congress of her term. During that address, she reaffirmed that she would pursue constitutional changes to the 1980 Constitution written under military dictatorship, although she left open key questions about procedure.

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Published on June 19, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Uncategorized