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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
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Understanding Turkey’s Restructured System for Judicial Appointments and Promotions

—Dr. Ali Dursun Ulusoy, Professor of Law at Ankara University, Former Justice of Turkish Council of State (Danistay), Visiting Scholar, UCLA Law[*] In some countries including Turkey, a special board of judges (and prosecutors) is in charge of nationwide appointments (for everything from regional to apex courts), reshuffles, reassignments, removals and disciplinary procedures of judges

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Published on April 19, 2018
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Transformative Constitutionalism in Latin America: A Dialogic Route to Utopia?

—Leonardo García Jaramillo, Universidad EAFIT, Government and Political Science Department-Colombia[*] In Latin America during the last three decades, the law (and particularly constitutional law) has been changing dramatically both anatomically and physiologically. It has become more widespread and more powerful, transforming its structure and shape, while its functions have grown in a more complex and inter-related

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Published on April 13, 2018
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Quo vadis, Inter-American Court? Activism, Backlash and Latin American Constitutionalism (I-CONnect Column)

—Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM, Mexico City [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 11, 2018
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The Agenda-Setting Crisis in the Brazilian Supreme Court

—Ranieri Lima Resende, PhD. in Law Candidate, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Visiting Doctoral Researcher, New York University; José Ribas Vieira, Full Professor of Constitutional Law, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).* The current national debate in Brazil about the recent imprisonment of the former President of the Republic, Luiz Inácio Lula

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Published on April 10, 2018
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Zuma’s South Africa: A Constitutional Post-Mortem (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four

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Published on March 28, 2018
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A Peek at the Soft Underbelly of Constitutions: The Politics of No-Confidence Votes (I-CONnect Column)

—Renáta Uitz, Central European University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2018,

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Published on February 28, 2018
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Weak-Form Judicial Review as a Way of Legally Facilitating Constitutional Moments?

—Richard Mailey, University of Trier, Lecturer in English Law and Terminology Since the passage of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982, the idea of “weak-form judicial review”[1] has sparked a significant level of academic interest, and has been adopted in amended form by New Zealand and the UK in the framing of their

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Published on February 22, 2018
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Fighting the “New Normal,” North and South (I-CONnect Column)

—Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM, Mexico City [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on February 14, 2018
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One Step Forward, Two Steps Back? Constructive res judicata in Malaysian Constitutional Cases

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students LL.B. Student Contribution –Shukri Ahmad Shahizam, LL.B. Candidate, London School of Economics In a long-awaited judgement with large ramifications on cases throughout the country the apex court in Malaysia, the Federal Court, has thrown a spanner into the works of constitutional challenges against restrictions on fundamental freedoms. Mat

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Published on February 3, 2018
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Crisis and its Opposite: A Reminiscence of Same-Sex Marriage’s Most Successful Year (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on January 31, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis