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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
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What’s New in Public Law

—Davide Bacis, PhD Student in Constitutional Law, University of Pavia (Italy) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To

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Published on June 11, 2018
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A Change in the Climate: Partly Cloudy with Increasing Litigation (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on May 30, 2018
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The Oldest-Newest Separation of Powers

—Yaniv Roznai, Senior Lecturer, Radzyner Law School, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya. Separation of powers is a basic idea within constitutional theory. The principle of separation of powers, as famously described by Montesquieu in his The Spirit of the Laws, centered around three governmental branches: legislative power, executive power and judging power; a separation that was needed

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Published on May 23, 2018
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The Rule of Law in Brazil: A Conceptual Challenge

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília  Reinhart Koselleck, one of the most prominent German historians of the twentieth century, once wrote that “conceptual change is generally slower and more gradual than the pace of political events.”[1] Time and experience are required for properly grasping the distinct nuances of a concept. Every concept – he says

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Published on May 2, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — Judging Constitutional Conventions

[Editor’s Note: This is the seventh and final entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, the first entry is available here, the second entry is available here, the third is available here, the fourth is available here, the fifth is available here, and the sixth is available here.] —Farrah Ahmed, Associate

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Published on April 29, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — Public Office and Public Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the sixth entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, the first entry is available here, the second entry is available here, the third is available here, the fourth is available here, and the fifth is available here.] —Janet McLean, Professor of Law, The University of Auckland In the

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Published on April 28, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — The Social Dimension of the Rule of Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, the first entry is available here, the second entry is available here, the third is available here, and the fourth is available here.] —Jeff King, Professor of Law, University College London One question about constitutional boundaries relates

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Published on April 27, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — Civil Society

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, the first entry is available here, the second entry is available here, and the third is available here.] —N.W. Barber, Professor of Constitutional Law and Theory, Trinity College, Oxford University The paper discusses the boundary between the public and the

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Published on April 26, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — The Relevance of Past, Present and Future to the Concept of (Constitutional) Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the third entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, the first entry is available here, and the second entry is available here.] —Peter Oliver, Full Professor and Vice Dean Research, Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa In keeping with the theme of the workshop, my paper identified a

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Published on April 25, 2018
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I-CONnect Symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries” — Proportionality and the Boundaries of Borrowing

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in our symposium on “Constitutional Boundaries.” The introduction to the symposium is available here, and the first entry is available here.] —Adrienne Stone, Kathleen Fitzpatrick Australian Laureate Fellow, Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor, Director of the Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Law School Australian constitutional law is having something of

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Published on April 24, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis