magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
formats

Late Soviet Constitutional Supervision: A Model for Central Asian Constitutional Review?

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on October 2, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Research: The Distinction between Constitutional and Administrative Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the final entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Farrah Ahmed, University of Melbourne Are constitutional and administrative law distinguishable? If so, how? These questions are often met with indifference or scepticism. In the UK it is said that “the

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law Theory and Empirical Research

[Editor’s Note: This is the seventh entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Sarah Nason, Prifysgol Bangor University Studies examining empirical dimensions of administrative law have grown up in parallel too, but largely disconnected from, theoretical work. Some suggests that contemporary preoccupation both with

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 21, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Non-Statutory Executive Powers in the Commonwealth Constitutional Family

[Editor’s Note: This is the sixth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –J.G. Allen, Humboldt University of Berlin Centre for British Studies, University of Tasmania Faculty of Law The nature and source of non-statutory executive powers has increased in importance in recent decades

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 20, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Pardon Paradox

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Adam Perry, University of Oxford Almost every constitution in the world confers a power to pardon.  Pardon powers are found in the constitutions of old states and new states, Western states

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 17, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Prerogative, The Third Source, and Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Max Harris, University of Oxford Administrative lawyers and administrative law theorists ignore the prerogative and the third source at their peril. Wherever the exact boundaries of administrative law theory are drawn,

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Maitland’s Challenge

[Editor’s Note: This is the third entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Jacob Weinrib, Queen’s Faculty of Law In the final years of the nineteenth century, FW Maitland looked to “the real practical working of English public law”[1] and observed a transformation: “The

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Systematically Studying Review of Reason-Giving

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Joanna Bell, University of Cambridge In a thought-provoking blogpost published earlier this year, Richard Kirkham & Elizabeth O’Loughlin made a case for greater systematic study of administrative law issues. Academic commentary

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law and Democracy

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Hasan Dindjer, University of Oxford Decisions by public authorities are often thought to possess a democratic imprimatur which properly insulates them from certain kinds of interference by courts. Executive and administrative

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 10, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: In this “Showcase,” we feature a series of posts introducing new ideas in theoretical approaches to administrative law. These ideas emerged from papers presented in a workshop at the University of Oxford organized by Thomas Adams, Hasan Dindjer and Adam Perry. This Showcase will feature eight sets of new ideas. In this post,

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 8, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis