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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
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Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part II

[Editor’s Note: This is Part II of a two-part series. Part I was published here on February 26, 2017.] —Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* As I have argued in Part I of this series, the “politics of resentment” endanger the

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Published on March 9, 2017
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The “C word”: Democratic Decay and the New Frontiers of Comparative Law (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

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Published on March 8, 2017
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Of the Politics of Resentment and European Disintegration: Are the European Peoples Ready to Keep Paddling Together? Part I

—Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, Professor of Law and Director of the Department of European and Comparative Law at the University of Gdańsk, Poland* The Politics of Resentment. What is in a Name? It is trite to say that today “resentment” sweeps across Europe. Yet beyond this sweeping statement, the concept itself, its consequences and modus operandi, are

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Published on February 26, 2017
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Comparative Law in the Age of Trump (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on February 22, 2017
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On the Looming Split in the Polish Constitutional Order: Harris v Dönges in Central Europe?

—Mikołaj Barczentewicz, University College, University of Oxford As has been widely reported (see, e.g., here), the Polish Constitutional Tribunal is now headed and effectively controlled by the judges appointed in a controversial manner by the Law and Justice (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość, PiS) party. This means that PiS is in a position to view the Tribunal

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Published on February 18, 2017
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The Impact of a Trump Presidency for Constitutionalism and Human Rights in Latin America (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on February 9, 2017
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The Irrelevance of Liberal Constitutionalists: Germany, India and the United States (I-CONnect Column)

—Menaka Guruswamy, Fellow, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and Advocate, Supreme Court of India [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more

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Published on January 25, 2017
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Enough Complacency: Fighting Democratic Decay in 2017 (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is the inaugural I-CONnect column — a new column will appear once every two weeks.  The idea of the columns is to provide the blog with regular contributors who have a distinctive voice and unique perspective on public law. Columns, while scholarly in

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Published on January 11, 2017
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Two Kinds of Unconstitutional Constitutional Interpretations in China’s Hong Kong

—Dr. P.Y. Lo, Barrister-at-law, Gilt Chambers, Hong Kong; Faculty of Law, The University of Hong Kong The taking of oaths by two members of the Legislative Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) at the first meeting of the newly elected Legislative Council on 12 October

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Published on December 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Developments
 
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UK Learns Brexit is Easier Said Than Done

[This post was first published on the website of the Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies at Yale. It is republished here with permission of the author.] —David R. Cameron, Professor of Political Science, Director of the Program on European Union Studies, Yale University When Prime Minister Theresa May took over

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Published on December 23, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis