magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
formats

The Post-Soviet Constitutional Rights Community

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on December 4, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan: Marbury-Style Judicial Empowerment?

—Neil Modi, Visiting Researcher, Georgetown University Law Center The Pakistani Supreme Court’s decision in District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan (2015) serves as a good illustration of an attempt of judicial self-empowerment, akin to a Marbury v. Madison-style moment.[1] By this I mean that the strategy adopted by the court in this case

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on December 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Navigating Constitution Building and Political Transitions in Sri Lanka

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on November 27, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Special Undergraduate Series—Reservations Based on Economic Criteria: A Policy Assessment: Will the Government Succeed in Bringing an End to Poverty with Reservation?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law StudentsLL.B. Student Contribution –Manisha Bhau, B.A., LL.B Student (Hons.), National Law University, Delhi Despite reports that the numbers have nearly halved, India is still home to about 364 million people leading lives without access to basic healthcare, nutrition and sanitation. There are a multitude of reasons behind India’s rampant

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on November 23, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

“Suraméxit” and Latin American Disintegration

—Juan C. Herrera, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg What’s going on in Latin America? The socio-political demands throughout the year and especially of recent weeks provide an excellent opportunity to reflect on what could become a South American Spring. Are governments or institutions failing? The general

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on November 6, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Late Soviet Constitutional Supervision: A Model for Central Asian Constitutional Review?

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on October 2, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Research: The Distinction between Constitutional and Administrative Law

[Editor’s Note: This is the final entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Farrah Ahmed, University of Melbourne Are constitutional and administrative law distinguishable? If so, how? These questions are often met with indifference or scepticism. In the UK it is said that “the

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law Theory and Empirical Research

[Editor’s Note: This is the seventh entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Sarah Nason, Prifysgol Bangor University Studies examining empirical dimensions of administrative law have grown up in parallel too, but largely disconnected from, theoretical work. Some suggests that contemporary preoccupation both with

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 21, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Non-Statutory Executive Powers in the Commonwealth Constitutional Family

[Editor’s Note: This is the sixth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –J.G. Allen, Humboldt University of Berlin Centre for British Studies, University of Tasmania Faculty of Law The nature and source of non-statutory executive powers has increased in importance in recent decades

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 20, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Pardon Paradox

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Adam Perry, University of Oxford Almost every constitution in the world confers a power to pardon.  Pardon powers are found in the constitutions of old states and new states, Western states

Read More…

Print Friendly
Published on September 17, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis