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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home Archive for category "Analysis"
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Safeguarding Democratic Institutions

—Samuel Issacharoff, NYU School of Law [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] A discussion of courts and populism begs for definitional boundaries.  While courts are generally institutionally confined, the same cannot be said for populism, a

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Published on April 29, 2017
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Trapped in the Age of Trump: the American Supreme Court and 21st Century Populism

—Or Bassok, University of Nottingham [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. The author thanks Shay Levi for his valuable comments.] The American Supreme Court is currently ill-equipped to confront populism. The Court’s deficiency is not because of

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Published on April 28, 2017
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Courts in a Populist World

—Alon Harel, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] “I did not come to in order to be loved but in order to voice the sentiments of the public,” said Minister Miri

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Published on April 27, 2017
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Distinguishing Among Referenda (I-CONnect Column)

—Aslı Bâli, UCLA School of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 27, 2017
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Populist Constitutionalism & The Democratic Minimum Core

—Rosalind Dixon, University of New South Wales [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Democratic “populism” is on the rise worldwide. In the last decade, Latin America has seen a wave of populist, neo-Bolivarian political change; Hungary

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Published on April 26, 2017
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Populism and the Courts

—Andrew Arato, The New School [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] The antagonism of populist governments to apex courts is a matter of historical record, starting with Peronism, the first time that an openly populist movement

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Published on April 25, 2017
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Populist Constitutions – A Contradiction in Terms?

—Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton University [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Professor Müller’s post is adapted from his book What is Populism? (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and from “Populism and Constitutionalism,” forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Populism.]

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Published on April 23, 2017
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Introduction: Constitutional Courts and Populism

—Michaela Hailbronner, University of Münster, Germany, and David Landau, Florida State University College of Law This mini-symposium is a joint project between the editors of the Verfassungsblog and the editors of I-Connect. We have brought together a number of prominent scholars, working on different issues, approaches, and regions of the world, and invite contributions by others,

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Published on April 22, 2017
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Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the “New Populism”

—András László Pap, Research Chair, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre for Social Sciences Institute for Legal Studies; SASPRO-Marie-Curie Fellow, Slovak Academy of Sciences Institute for Sociology; Recurrent Visiting (Adjunct) Professor, Central European University; Professor, National University of Public Service, Budapest, and Anna Śledzińska-Simon, Assistant Professor, University of Wrocław   The Hungarian and Polish experience of constitutional capture

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Published on April 19, 2017
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The Constitutional Burden of the Global Imagination (I-CONnect Column)

—Menaka Guruswamy, Fellow, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and Advocate, Supreme Court of India [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more

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Published on March 29, 2017
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