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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by Richard Albert (Page 5)
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law and Democracy

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Hasan Dindjer, University of Oxford Decisions by public authorities are often thought to possess a democratic imprimatur which properly insulates them from certain kinds of interference by courts. Executive and administrative

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Published on September 10, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Davide Bacis, PhD Student in Constitutional Law, University of Pavia (Italy) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To

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Published on September 9, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: In this “Showcase,” we feature a series of posts introducing new ideas in theoretical approaches to administrative law. These ideas emerged from papers presented in a workshop at the University of Oxford organized by Thomas Adams, Hasan Dindjer and Adam Perry. This Showcase will feature eight sets of new ideas. In this post,

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Published on September 8, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Announcement–New Book: “Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions” (OUP 2019)

—Richard Albert, William Stamps Farish Professor in Law and Professor of Government, The University of Texas at Austin Last month, Oxford University Press (OUP) published my book on “Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions.” It is available from OUP here at a 30% discount with this promotion code: ALAUTHC4. Here is a short description

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Published on September 7, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Deadline: September 15–Call for Papers–Symposium on “When is a Constitutional Amendment Illegitimate?”–National University of Singapore–March 19-20, 2020

The National University of Singapore Faculty of LawCentre for Asian Legal Studies in collaboration with the The University of Texas at Austininvite submissions for Symposium on “When is a Constitutional Amendment Illegitimate?” The National University of Singapore (NUS)Faculty of LawMarch 19-20, 2020 Convened by Jaclyn Neo (NUS)Kevin Tan (NUS)Richard Albert (Texas) Submissions are invited from early-career

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Published on September 6, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Invitation to Friends of I-CONnect: Colloquium on Comparative Constitutional Law and Politics

—Richard Albert, Williams Stamps Farish Professor in Law and Professor of Government, The University of Texas at Austin All are welcome to attend sessions of the Colloquium on Comparative Constitutional Law and Politics, held here at the University of Texas at Austin over the next few months. All sessions will run from 3:45pm to 5:45pm

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Published on September 5, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Visions of Representation in Croatian Direct Democracy

–Matija Miloš, Faculty of Law, University of Rijeka, Croatia What does it mean to “represent” the electorate? This issue is in the core of ongoing controversies raised by citizens’ initiatives, a form of direct democracy made a part of the Croatian Constitution almost twenty years ago. While direct democracy is normally reduced to an unmediated

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Published on September 3, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Simon Drugda, PhD Candidate at the University of Copenhagen In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant

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Published on September 2, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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To Prorogue or Not: An Implied Constitutional Convention to End a ‘Constitutional Outrage’

—Theodore Konstadinides, Professor of Law, University of Essex, and Charilaos Nikolaidis, Lecturer in Law, University of Essex What would happen if the Queen decided not to give her assent to a bill properly passed by the Houses of Parliament? The answer is an unstable and dangerous situation – a constitutional confrontation or outrage. We are

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Published on September 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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‘Four Interpretations (Barely) Make One Footnote’: Pension Trio, Same-Sex Marriage, and the Casting of the TCC’s Reform Jurisprudence in Justice Stone

—Ming-Sung Kuo, Associate Professor of Law, University of Warwick and Hui-Wen Chen, Research Assistant, University of Warwick On 23 August, the Taiwan Constitutional Court (TCC) pronounced the much expected decision on the constitutionality of controversial legislation on pension reform in three Interpretations, namely, Interpretation Nos 781, 782, and 783, which we call the Pension Trio. 

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Published on August 27, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments