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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by Richard Albert (Page 4)
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What’s New in Public Law

–Nausica Palazzo, Lecturer in Public Law, Bocconi University In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on September 23, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law Theory and Empirical Research

[Editor’s Note: This is the seventh entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Sarah Nason, Prifysgol Bangor University Studies examining empirical dimensions of administrative law have grown up in parallel too, but largely disconnected from, theoretical work. Some suggests that contemporary preoccupation both with

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Published on September 21, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Non-Statutory Executive Powers in the Commonwealth Constitutional Family

[Editor’s Note: This is the sixth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –J.G. Allen, Humboldt University of Berlin Centre for British Studies, University of Tasmania Faculty of Law The nature and source of non-statutory executive powers has increased in importance in recent decades

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Published on September 20, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Pardon Paradox

[Editor’s Note: This is the fifth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Adam Perry, University of Oxford Almost every constitution in the world confers a power to pardon.  Pardon powers are found in the constitutions of old states and new states, Western states

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Published on September 17, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Gaurav Mukherjee, S.J.D. Candidate in Comparative Constitutional Law, Central European University, Budapest In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere.

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Published on September 16, 2019
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Special Undergraduate Series–The Misplaced Objections Against the Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, 2019 (India)

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law StudentsLL.B. Student Contribution –Anmol Jain, B.A., LL.B. Student (Hons.), National Law University, Jodhpur, India Last month, the Lower House of the Indian Parliament passed the Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, 2019 to ‘provide for protection of rights of transgender persons and their welfare.’ This comes after a series

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Published on September 15, 2019
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Call for Papers–European Journal of International Law–Inequalities in International Law: The EJIL Symposium 2021

International law in the UN Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and other foundational treaties and conventions of the multilateral system entails a premise (and promise) of equal rights, the right to self-determination, and the fundamental equality of human beings. However, during the last 10 years and in the wake of the 2008 financial

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Published on September 14, 2019
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Prerogative, The Third Source, and Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Max Harris, University of Oxford Administrative lawyers and administrative law theorists ignore the prerogative and the third source at their peril. Wherever the exact boundaries of administrative law theory are drawn,

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Published on September 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Maitland’s Challenge

[Editor’s Note: This is the third entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Jacob Weinrib, Queen’s Faculty of Law In the final years of the nineteenth century, FW Maitland looked to “the real practical working of English public law”[1] and observed a transformation: “The

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Published on September 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Systematically Studying Review of Reason-Giving

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Joanna Bell, University of Cambridge In a thought-provoking blogpost published earlier this year, Richard Kirkham & Elizabeth O’Loughlin made a case for greater systematic study of administrative law issues. Academic commentary

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Published on September 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis