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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by Richard Albert (Page 110)
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Showing Germans the Light

–Or Bassok, Tikvah Scholar, NYU School of Law Conferences in the US on German public law often digress into an attempt by Americans scholars to show their German counterparts the scholarly “light.” The recipe has several variations.[1] According to the milder version, German public law scholarship fails to give an adequate account of reality when it

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Published on May 22, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Four Models of Politicized Judicial Selection

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Judges on national courts of last resort are generally appointed in politicized processes. Judicial selection is politicized when the choice rests on popular consent mediated in some way through elected representatives. We can identify four major models of politicized judicial selection in constitutional states: (1) executive unilateral appointment; (2)

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Published on April 21, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Differencing Same-Sex Marriage

–Russell Miller, Washington & Lee University School of Law, Co-Author, The Constitutional Jurisprudence of the Federal Republic of Germany (2012), Co-Editor-in-Chief, German Law Journal As a comparative lawyer it is tempting to see a once-in-a-generation convergence of American and German constitutional law on what many regard as the era’s foremost civil rights issue:  same-sex marriage. 

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Published on April 19, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The End of Liberal Constitutionalism in Hungary?

–Gábor Halmai, Professor of Law, Eötvös Lóránd University (Budapest) and Visiting Research Scholar, Princeton University Last month, on March 11, the Hungarian Parliament voted on the fourth amendment to the the country’s 2011 constitution which has moved many statutory provision into the constitution despite Constitutional Court rulings striking them down and the European Union, the

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Published on April 17, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Book Review/Response: Claudia Haupt and Markus Thiel on Church and State in Germany and the United States

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review/Response Series, Markus Thiel reviews Claudia Haupt’s recently-published book Religion-State Relations in the United States and Germany: The Quest for Neutrality. Claudia Haupt then responds to Markus Thiel’s review.] —Markus Thiel, Professor of Public Law, University of Applied Sciences for Public Administration North Rhine-Westphalia, Cologne, and Associate

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Published on April 15, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Crisis Averted? Foreign Domestic Helpers, the Basic Law and Hong Kong’s Court of Final Appeal

–Alvin Y. H. Cheung, Barrister-at-Law, Sir Oswald Cheung’s Chambers, Hong Kong In the Vallejos Evangeline Banao v Commissioner of Registration & Another judgment handed down on 25 March 2013,[1] the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal (“CFA”) held that, on a proper construction of article 24(2)(4) of the Basic Law, the constitutional document of the Hong

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Published on April 13, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Socioeconomic Rights and Constitutional Legitimacy in India

—Rehan Abeyratne, Jindal Global Law School In a forthcoming article, I examine socioeconomic rights in the Indian Constitution and the increasingly central role the Supreme Court plays in their enforcement. As Nilesh Sinha recently noted on this blog, India’s judicial independence has allowed the Court to secure broad socioeconomic justice, despite allegations of corruption and

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Published on April 11, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Ireland’s Constitutional Convention Considers Same-Sex Marriage

—Eoin Carolan, University College Dublin With some time to pass before the US Supreme Court delivers its keenly-watched ruling in U.S. v. Windsor, arguments about constitutional rights and same-sex marriage are due to receive another outing this weekend as part of Ireland’s ongoing Constitutional Convention. The Convention was established in partial response to public demands for

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Published on April 9, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Ombudsman as an Institution of European Administrative Law

—Dr. Julia Haas, Attorney-at-law (Rechtsanwältin), Hamburg (Germany) The ombudsman is presumably one of the most important Scandinavian contributions to worldwide constitutional development. Its origins can be traced back to the Swedish institution of the Justitieombudsman which was introduced in the Swedish constitution of 1809. The original Swedish idea of an “ombudsman” (meaning “representative” or “commissioner”)

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Published on March 27, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, Younger Comparativists; New Scholarship
 
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Why *Judicial* Review: A Preliminary Typology of Scholarly Arguments

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School It was perhaps inevitable that the advent of written constitutionalism would quicken the rise of judicial review. The writtenness of a constitution creates a ready-made argument in favor of judicial review, namely that the constitutional text sets the standard against which the constitutionality of governmental action must be measured,

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Published on March 25, 2013
Author:          Filed under: Analysis