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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by Richard Albert (Page 109)
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Our Electoral Exceptionalism

—Nicholas Stephanopoulos, Assistant Professor, University of Chicago In all countries that employ single-member districts (or small multimember districts), redistricting is a vital issue.  How districts are drawn influences, among other things, how competitive races will be, how many members of minority groups will be elected, and which party will control a majority in the legislature.

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Published on October 23, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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In Search of Alternative Standards for the Adjudication of Socioeconomic Rights

—Carlos Bernal, Senior Lecturer, Macquarie University Socioeconomic rights are one of the greatest innovations of contemporary constitutionalism, in particular, of developing countries. Some of their constitutions address the issues of poverty, unsatisfied basic needs, lack of resources for the exercise of freedoms and political rights, and unequal distribution of opportunities and wealth, by means of

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Published on October 22, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Local Injustice: Why We Shouldn’t Forget about Saif Gaddafi

—Ruti Teitel, 2012-13 Straus fellow at NYU School of Law, Ernst C. Stiefel Professor of Comparative Law at New York Law School, and author of Transitional Justice (OUP 2000) and Humanity’s Law (OUP 2012).   In the London newspaper the Daily Mail, Saif Gaddafi’s longtime girlfriend, Orly Weinerman, has asked that Saif be spared prosecution

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Published on October 16, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The German Constitutional Court and Europe

[By Russell Miller, Professor of Law at Washington & Lee University, co-author of the forthcoming The Constitutional Jurisprudence of the Federal Republic of Germany (3d ed. 2012)] On 12 September 2012 the German Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) is set to announce its ruling on requests for temporary injunctions that would keep President Gauck from giving his

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Published on September 5, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Europe, German Constitutional Court, hp
 
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Call for Papers–Annual Meeting of the American Society of Comparative Law

The Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law is pleased to invite submissions to fill a panel on “New Perspectives in Comparative Law,” to be held at the Society’s 2012 Annual Meeting in Iowa City, Iowa, on October 4-6 at the University of Iowa College of Law. The purpose of the panel

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Nepal’s Constitutional Future

Yesterday, Nepali Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai dissolved the Constituent Assembly after it failed to create a new constitution by its midnight deadline. Prime Minister Bhattarai subsequently scheduled elections to form a new assembly in November. The principal challenge of constitutional design in Nepal concerns federalism, specifically the promise and peril of creating an ethnic-based federalism

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The Changing Composition of the Canadian Supreme Court

Earlier this morning, the Supreme Court of Canada announced that Justice Marie Deschamps will retire from the bench on August 7, 2012. She was originally appointed on August 8, 2002. Justice Deschamps will therefore have served ten years on the high court. The coming vacancy will give conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper the opportunity to make his fifth

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Published on May 18, 2012
Author:          Filed under: hp, Richard Albert, Stephen Harper, Supreme Court of Canada
 
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Scholarly Announcements for Comparativists

Below, I’m pleased to share three announcements from two groups with which I’m involved. The first is a new Call for Papers from the AALS Section on Law and South Asian Studies. It is open to all comparativists irrespective of seniority. The next two are targeted to younger comparativists, defined as scholars who have been

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Published on January 25, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Announcements; Call for Papers, hp, Richard Albert
 
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“Guiding Cases” in China

The Supreme People’s Court of the People’s Republic of China has begun the practice of announcing “guiding cases.” These are cases that, as explained here, “provide guidance to people’s courts in hearing similar cases and handing down judgments, and reference shall be made by judges in hearing similar cases and cited as the basis for

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Published on January 19, 2012
Author:          Filed under: China, hp, Richard Albert
 
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Hungary’s New Constitution

The new constitution of Hungary—called the Fundamental Law of Hungary—became effective a couple of days ago on January 1, 2012. The day after its coming into force, thousands of Hungarians gathered in Budapest to protest the nation’s new constitution. Analyses of the day’s events are available here, here and here. Princeton’s Kim Lane Scheppele is quoted offering some noteworthy observations near

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Published on January 4, 2012
Author:          Filed under: hp, Hungary, new constitution, Richard Albert