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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
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Five Questions with Kim Lane Scheppele

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In “Five Questions” here at I-CONnect, we invite a public law scholar to answer five questions about his or her research. This edition of “Five Questions” features Kim Lane Scheppele, the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the University Center for Human Values

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Published on August 17, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Japan Supreme Court Limits Police GPS Surveillance, Citing Constitution Article 35

–Lawrence Repeta, Member, Japan Civil Liberties Union and former Professor, Meiji University On March 15 of this year, the Supreme Court of Japan issued a rare decision that limits the authority of the police to conduct surveillance operations. The case involved the placement of GPS tracking devices on the vehicles of surveillance targets. According to the

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Published on August 16, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Developments in German Constitutional Law: The Year 2016 in Review

Editor’s Note: Today we publish the 2016 report on German constitutional law, which appears in the larger 44-country 2016 Global Review of Constitutional Law. The entire 2016 Global Review is now available in a smaller file size for downloading and emailing: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3014378. —Christoph Möllers, Professor of Public Law and Legal Philosophy at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and

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Published on August 15, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Vicente F. Benítez R., Constitutional Law Professor, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia) and JSD student at NYU In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from

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Published on August 14, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Developments in Italian Constitutional Law: The Year 2016 in Review

[Editor’s Note: Today we publish the 2016 Report on Italian constitutional law, which appears in the larger 44-country Global Review of Constitutional Law, now available in a smaller file size for downloading and emailing: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3014378.] –Pietro Faraguna (LUISS University of Rome), Michele Massa (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milano), Diletta Tega (University of Bologna), coordinated

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Published on August 13, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Constitutional Fidelity and the Polish Constitution

–Tomasz Tadeusz Koncewicz, University of Gdańsk, 2017-18 LAPA Fellow, Princeton University, currently Visiting Professor, Radzyner Law School, IDC Herzliya Tread softly because you tread on my dreams –W.B. Yeats, The Cloths of Heaven Recent weeks have seen the biggest mass protests in Poland since 1989. In major Polish cities thousands were out in the streets

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Published on August 11, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Five Questions with Vlad Perju

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In “Five Questions” here at I-CONnect, we invite a public law scholar to answer five questions about his or her research. This edition of “Five Questions” features Vlad Perju, Director of the Clough Center for the Study of Constitutional Democracy and Professor of Law at Boston College Law School. His full bio follows below:

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Published on August 10, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Virtual Bookshelf–Siren Songs or Legal Authority?: A Brief Review of “Constitutional Preambles,” by Wim Voermans, Maarten Stremler and Paul Cliteur

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Samoa recently amended its constitution to declare itself a Christian state. For some, this was a curious move given that Samoa’s preamble already proclaims Christianity as the national religion. Why, then, was the amendment necessary? A recent article explains: Samoa already had a reference to Christianity in the preamble

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Published on August 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Book Review: Cornelia Weiss on Helen Irving’s “Constitutions and Gender”

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Cornelia Weiss reviews Helen Irving’s Constitutions and Gender (Edward Elgar 2017)] –Cornelia Weiss, Colonel, U.S. Air Force Reserve Judge Advocate Corps* As incredible as it seems, it was not until 1971 that the U.S. Supreme Court ever declared a statute that discriminated against women as unconstitutional.  That

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Published on August 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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“Quasi Constitutional” Status as *Not* Implying a Form Requirement

—Maxime St-Hilaire, Faculté de droit, Université de Sherbrooke In his post on this blog, Adam Perry writes that the British cases on what are known in the UK as constitutional statutes (and in Canada as quasi–constitutional statutes) “have been very controversial in constitutional circles”, whereas, by contrast, “the Canadian cases caused barely a ripple.” I would

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Published on August 8, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis