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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlansbergr (Page 2)
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Foreign Affairs article on Arab Spring Constitutionalism

Anthony Billingsley has written an interesting article on constitution-making in the wake of the Arab Spring for Foreign Affairs.

Published on December 1, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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The Right to Rebel in Ghana

This is the third in a series of case studies on the Constitutional Right to Rebel: Ghana ———————————————————————————————— The nation of Ghana was formed in 1957 as a sovereign union between the recently independent British protectorates of Gold Coast and Togoland. After an embryonic representative government collapsed in 1966, the country passed from coup to

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Published on November 7, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Ghana, Right to Rebel, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Right to Rebel in Venezuela

This is the second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the potential risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel. Case Study 2: Venezuela The seeds

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A Right to Rebel in Venezuela

A second country study in Tom Ginsburg and I’s ongoing project to identify the risks and rewards of a constitutional Right to Rebel – Venezuela has had 26 separate constitutions since independence and the most recent have included various justifications for a popular right to rebel. Case Study 2: Venezuela The seeds for democratic governance

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Published on November 1, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Fidel Castro’s Right to Rebel

Tom Ginsburg and I are currently exploring the causes and effects of “right to rebel” provisions in constitutions. One of the country studies we will be including in our upcoming article on the subject is the following example from Cuban History. We would very much welcome any comments on the topic, or suggestions as to

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Published on October 30, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Cuba, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Right to Rebel, Tom Ginsburg
 
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Doctrine of Necessity in Nepal: A Bractonian Blunder?

Henry de Bracton was a 13th Century British jurist who, among other things, defended supreme papal authority over secular affairs and recommended that criminal trials be undertaken “by ordeal” (wherein the defendant would hold red-hot iron or be thrown bound into a lake under the premise that a just god would protect the innocent). While

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Published on October 6, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Fiji, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan
 
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In Ecuador, Autocracy by Referendum

A frustrated Simon Bolivar is said to have once complained of his empire that Colombia was a university, Venezuela a barracks, and Ecuador a convent. This assessment seemed surprisingly prescient last week, with a Colombian education minister appointed emergency mayor of Bogota, Venezuela accused by the IISS of arming FARC rebels, and Ecuadorians passing a

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Published on May 19, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Bolivia, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Ecuador, honduras, venezuela
 
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Mandatory Military Service and Broken Promises in Azerbaijan: The Case of Bakhtiyar Hajiyev

Last week, Bakhtiyar Hajiyev spent his 29th birthday in an Azeri jail for the crime of refusing military service. At present he has remained incarcerated for more than a month. In Azerbaijan, a country where extralegal detentions and human rights abuses are tragically normal, this particular arrest has caused a stir in the international media

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Published on April 6, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Azerbaijan, Conscription, Council of Europe, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez
 
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The Confederate States of America Constitution at 150

This month marks the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Confederate Constitution into law. Following weeks of deliberation by forty-three delegates from seven states, the Confederacy formally ratified the document on March 11, 1861. Four more States, and two territories, would later join the Confederate States of America (CSA) and in doing so adopt

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Published on March 25, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, United States
 
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The Constitutional Right to Rebel – advice for Egypt?

The ripple effects from Tunisia’s “Jasmine Revolution” are still making themselves felt throughout the Arab World. Earlier today, Egypt’s Mubarak stepped down after weathering large-scale protests and civil disobedience for over two weeks. Elsewhere in the region Lebanon, Algeria, Yemen, Jordan (and to a lesser extent Mauritania, Sudan, Syria, Libya, and Morocco) have also seen

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Published on February 11, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional design, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, Egypt, Tunisia