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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlandau (Page 9)
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A Change in the Climate: Partly Cloudy with Increasing Litigation (I-CONnect Column)

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on May 30, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Future of (International) Cultural Heritage Law (I·CON Volume 16, Issue 1: Editorial)

—Lorenzo Casini, Professor of Administrative Law, IMT School for advanced studies of Lucca (Italy).* As good as it gets? On September 27, 2016, the International Criminal Court (ICC), for the first time, punished the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a war crime.[1] On March 24, 2017, the United Nations Security Council approved its Resolution no.

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Published on May 17, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Constitutionalizing Clear Rules for Political Transition: Entrenching the Malaysian Tsunami (I-CONnect Column)

—Jaclyn L. Neo, National University of Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on May 16, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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ICON’s Current Issue (Table of Contents)

Volume 16 Issue 1 Table of Contents Editorial Tributes to Norman Dorsen: Founding Editor of I.CON (1930–2017)  Articles Nicholas Aroney, The formation and amendment of federal constitutions in a Westminster-derived context Rosalind Dixon and Felix Uhlmann, The Swiss Constitution and a weak-form unconstitutional amendment doctrine? Ingo Venzke and Joana Mendes, The idea of relative authority

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Published on May 15, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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The Rule of Law in Brazil: A Conceptual Challenge

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília  Reinhart Koselleck, one of the most prominent German historians of the twentieth century, once wrote that “conceptual change is generally slower and more gradual than the pace of political events.”[1] Time and experience are required for properly grasping the distinct nuances of a concept. Every concept – he says

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Published on May 2, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The European Arrest Warrant as a Constitutional Instrument (I-CONnect Column)

—Renáta Uitz, Central European University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2018,

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Published on April 25, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Understanding Turkey’s Restructured System for Judicial Appointments and Promotions

—Dr. Ali Dursun Ulusoy, Professor of Law at Ankara University, Former Justice of Turkish Council of State (Danistay), Visiting Scholar, UCLA Law[*] In some countries including Turkey, a special board of judges (and prosecutors) is in charge of nationwide appointments (for everything from regional to apex courts), reshuffles, reassignments, removals and disciplinary procedures of judges

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Published on April 19, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Transformative Constitutionalism in Latin America: A Dialogic Route to Utopia?

—Leonardo García Jaramillo, Universidad EAFIT, Government and Political Science Department-Colombia[*] In Latin America during the last three decades, the law (and particularly constitutional law) has been changing dramatically both anatomically and physiologically. It has become more widespread and more powerful, transforming its structure and shape, while its functions have grown in a more complex and inter-related

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Published on April 13, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Quo vadis, Inter-American Court? Activism, Backlash and Latin American Constitutionalism (I-CONnect Column)

—Francisca Pou Giménez, ITAM, Mexico City [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for

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Published on April 11, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Agenda-Setting Crisis in the Brazilian Supreme Court

—Ranieri Lima Resende, PhD. in Law Candidate, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Visiting Doctoral Researcher, New York University; José Ribas Vieira, Full Professor of Constitutional Law, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).* The current national debate in Brazil about the recent imprisonment of the former President of the Republic, Luiz Inácio Lula

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Published on April 10, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis