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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlandau (Page 4)
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The Vices of Leaving This Undecided

—Renáta Uitz, Central European University [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2018,

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Published on January 3, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Challenges of Transformative Constitutionalism – A Reply to Jorge González Jácome

–Carlos Bernal, Justice, Colombian Constitutional Court[1] I In “The Promise and Peril of “Transformative Constitutionalism,” Jorge González Jácome comments on my earlier post here at I-CONnect on “The Paradox of the Transformative Role of the Colombian Constitutional Court.” González makes seven claims about my post: (a) That I “advanced an argument against the transformative role of

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Published on January 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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We Should Learn from Historians: Seeing the Future in Brazil’s Political Landscape

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development The election of Jair Bolsonaro as Brazil’s next President has sparked a fruitful debate over the expansion of an illiberal mindset across the globe, now reaching the biggest economy in Latin America and world’s fourth largest democracy. For some, Brazil seems

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Published on December 31, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Promise and Peril of “Transformative Constitutionalism” – A Reply to Justice Carlos Bernal

—Jorge González Jácome,[1] Universidad de los Andes In a recent piece published in this blog, a justice of the Colombian Constitutional Court, Carlos Bernal, advanced an argument against the transformative role of constitutional tribunals, particularly the Colombian Constitutional Court. In Justice Bernal’s view, when Courts adopt creative and strong mechanisms to make other branches of

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Published on December 27, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Rare, or Under-Cooked? The Appeal Ruling in the Urgenda Climate Change Case

—James Fowkes, University of Münster Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists

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Published on December 19, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Towards a Concept of Constitutional Authoritarianism: The Venezuelan Experience

—José Ignacio Hernández G., Universidad Católica Andrés Bello, Universidad Central (Venezuela); Center for International Development, Harvard University Democracy is in crisis. With this sentence Michael J. Abramowitz introduced the 2018 Freedom House report.[1] In a similar vein, Mark A. Graber, Sanford Levinson and Mark Tushnet recently concluded that constitutional democracy appears in trouble throughout the world.[2]

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Published on December 13, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Nine Good Reads and One Viewing

—J. H. H. Weiler, New York University School of Law; Co-Editor-in-Chief, I·CON For the first time I have managed to post my Good Reads online before Christmas. I publish my pick from some of the books that have come my way during this past year. These are not book reviews in the classical and rigorous sense

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Published on December 7, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Constitutional Chaos in Sri Lanka: Constitutional Retrogression or Working Out of its Constitutional Salvation?

—Jaclyn L. Neo, National University of Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on November 29, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Call for Papers: European Journal of International law

International Law and Democracy Revisited: The EJIL 30th Anniversary Symposium EJIL was founded in 1989, coinciding with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the attendant excitement encapsulated by that well-known optimistic/hubristic End of History phraseology, with predictions of liberal democracy to become regnant in the world and a New International Legal Order to replace

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Published on November 14, 2018
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Brazil Reckoning With its Past in Present Days: Will Judges Check Bolsonaro’s Government?

—Emilio Peluso Neder Meyer, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) and Felipe Guimarães Assis Tirado, LL.M. Candidate, King’s College London Three days after the election of the far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro to the Brazilian presidency, federal prosecutors filed a criminal complaint charging a former police officer and, for the first time, a former military prosecutor

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