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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlandau (Page 34)
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The Once and Future Court

—Erin Delaney, Northwestern University School of Law I regret to inform you, should you have been interested in applying for one of the three upcoming vacancies on the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, that the deadline has passed.  Applications were due at 5pm on October 30.   The Selection Commission will hold interviews for leading

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Published on December 17, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Developments, New Voices
 
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Egypt’s Leap into the Unknown: Article 219 and the Shari`‘a in the Draft Constitution

—Clark B. Lombardi, University of Washington School of Law, and Nathan J. Brown, George Washington University   (Posted originally on foreignpolicy.com) If a student of constitutional texts sat down to read the draft Egyptian constitution from beginning to end, he or she would find much of it familiar — the language, structure, and institutions would

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Published on December 14, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Jurist’s Prudence: The Indian Supreme Court’s response to institutional challenges

—Rohit De, University of Cambridge On 12th September, 2012, the Supreme Court of India in the case of Namit Sharma v Union of India, ruled on a constitutional challenge to the new Information Commissions set up under the Right to Information Act. The court was responding to a public interest petition that challenged the eligibility

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Published on December 12, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Is Egypt’s Transition to Democracy Really So Stupid?

—William Partlett, Columbia University Law School & Brookings Institution [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Egypt and the Forgotten Lessons of Democratic Transitions (Or: Democracy is Hard)

—David Landau, Florida State University College of Law [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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The Military, Constitutional Democracy, and Egypt

—Ozan Varol, Lewis & Clark Law School [Editors’ Note: In this forum on Egypt and New Perspectives on Constitution-Making, three young scholars of comparative constitutional law – Ozan Varol, Will Partlett, and David Landau – discuss their recent work on constitution-making and democratic transitions, focusing on Egypt. The work offers counter-intuitive predictions about the pace

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Published on November 11, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Comparative Access to Justice

— Steven D. Schwinn, Associate Professor of Law, The John Marshall Law School Access to justice is one of the more widely recognized privileges in constitutional law and international human rights today. All of the most progressive and contemporary constitutions and human rights instruments recognize some form of it. The South Africans, the Germans, the

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Published on November 10, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Making Government Work for the 99%? (And the 53%? And the 47%)?: Why we Need to Re-think the Separation in the Separation of Powers

—Eoin Carolan, Lecturer in Law, University College Dublin Has the separation of powers outlived its usefulness? After all, contemporary government bears little if any resemblance to the 18th century structures on which Montesquieu’s influential account of the separation of powers was modelled. Nor does government today mirror to a significant degree the adapted institutional arrangements

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Published on November 6, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Article Review: Mark Tushnet, Vicki Jackson and Rosalind Dixon on Outsider Constitutional Interpretation

[Editor’s note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Article Review Series, Mark Tushnet comments on Vicki Jackson and Rosalind Dixon’s article on “Constitutions Inside Out: Outsider Interventions in Domestic Constitutional Contests,” forthcoming in the Wake Forest Law Review. Professors Jackson and Dixon first describe their argument, and Professor Tushnet responds.] Another Dimension to Transnational Constitutionalism? Outsider

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Published on November 4, 2012
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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The value of case-specific inquiry in comparative constitutional law methodology: Preliminary thoughts and questions

—Claudia E. Haupt, Associate-in-Law, Columbia University What exactly are we doing when we engage in comparative constitutional inquiry? How do we choose the parameters of comparison? How do we determine whether we ought to engage in a large sample size (or large-N) or a small sample size (or small-N) study? Unsurprisingly, the reflexive answer is:

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Published on November 2, 2012
Author:          Filed under: New Voices, Uncategorized