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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlandau (Page 30)
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Turkey’s Presidential Elections: Towards the Confrontation between Constitutionalism and Power Politics

–Bertil Emrah Oder, Koç University Law School The expected has happened: Prime Minister Erdoğan is the President-elect. He won in the first round of elections on August 10, 2014, by receiving an absolute majority of the valid votes cast, namely 51.79%.[i] He is the second President elected by popular vote after Kenan Evren, leader of

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Published on August 16, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Uncelebrated Union

—Neil Walker, University of Edinburgh [Cross-posted from the Scottish Constitutional Futures Forum Blog] Last week’s first televised debate of the referendum campaign revealed few surprises of tone or content, even if the outcome disappointed pro-independence hopes of a momentum-building surge in support.  As expected, Alex Salmond concentrated on  the core message  of political self-determination, and the

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Published on August 15, 2014
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Fateful Elections? Investing in the Future of Europe (I·CON 12, Issue 2: Editorial)

—J. H. H. Weiler, Editorial Director, I·CON; President and Secretary General, European University Institute In a recent Editorial[1] I speculated on the potential transformative effect that the 2014 elections to the European Parliament might have on the democratic fortunes of Europe. I spoke of promise and risk. So now the results are out. How should we

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Published on August 8, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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I.CON’s current issue (Table of Contents)

I.CONVolume 12 Issue 2Table of Contents Editorial Articles Maurice Adams, Disabling constitutionalism. Can the politics of the Belgian Constitution be explained? Greg Taylor, Convention by consensus: Constitutional conventions in Germany Eric C. Ip, The democratic foundations of judicial review under authoritarianism: Theory and evidence from Hong Kong   Symposium: Multipolar Administrative Law Sabino Cassese, Giulio

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Published on August 6, 2014
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Why Hong Kong’s Lawyers Marched

–Alyssa S. King and Alvin Y. H. Cheung On June 27, 2014, up to 1,800 of Hong Kong’s legal professionals, including barristers, who litigate in the courts, and solicitors, who handle all lay client-facing work, marched in silence across the city’s center – for the third time since China resumed sovereignty in 1997[i] – in

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Published on July 2, 2014
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Judicial Activism and Forced Displacement: Lessons from the Colombian Paradox

—Cesar Rodríguez-Garavito, Universidad de los Andes and Dejusticia, and Diana Rodríguez-Franco, Northwestern University and Dejusticia Forced displacement affects millions of people in the world and entails a violation of basic human rights.  In many countries, given the lack of institutional capacity,  the main way of addressing this issue is through international human rights law  and

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Published on June 26, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Time and Sequence in Changes of Constitutional Regimes

—Andrew Arato, The New School for Social Research Introduction The concept of the constituent power emerged in the revolutions of the 17th and 18th centuries. Many new constitutions since then were made through variety of non-revolutionary processes. Yet, the normative link between democratic forms of constitution making and revolution, deeply embedded in the notion of

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Published on June 21, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Is Constitutional Review Moving to a New Home in Myanmar?

—Dominic J. Nardi, Jr., University of Michigan Late last year, Myanmar’s legislature initiated a process to review and amend the 2008 Constitution. Until recently, the largest opposition party, National League for Democracy, seemed focused on removing the ban against citizens with foreign dependents from becoming president (NLD leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s two sons are

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Published on June 11, 2014
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The Indonesian General Election and the “Weak” Constitutional Court

—Stefanus Hendrianto, Santa Clara University May 2014 was quite a month in Indonesian constitutional politics. On May 19th, 2014, the Indonesian Constitutional Court stripped out its own authority to review regional election disputes involving heads of government. On the following day, the General Election Commission closed the nomination for the 2014 presidential election. After weeks

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Published on June 4, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Naz Foundation III

—Rosalind Dixon, Professor of Law, UNSW Australia Faculty of Law; Rishad Chowdhury, Partner, Verus Advocates, Delhi. The Indian Supreme Court is soon likely to hear Curative Petitions challenging its judgment in the Naz Foundation case [available at http://judis.nic.in/supremecourt/imgs1.aspx?filename=41070], which reversed the judgment of the Delhi High Court partially striking down Section 377 of the Indian

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Published on May 16, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments