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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home Articles posted by dlandau (Page 29)
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There are Still Judges in Berlin: On the Proposal to Amend the Ecuadorian Constitution to Allow Indefinite Presidential Reelection

—Carlos Bernal Pulido, Macquarie Law School Es gibt noch Richter in Berlin!, There are still judges in Berlin! was the well-known acclamation of the humble miller, when he learned that the Prussian King Frederick II, the Great, had ordered the demolition of his mill obstructing the views of the new royal palace in Potsdam. The

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Published on September 10, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Call for Papers: 4th Annual YCC Conference

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPARATIVE LAW YOUNGER COMPARATIVISTS COMMITTEE  CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT The Younger Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law is pleased to invite submissions for its fourth annual conference, to be held on April 16-17, 2015, at Florida State University College of Law in Tallahassee, Florida.  The purpose of the conference is to

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Published on September 2, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Can Indonesia Learn From the Thai Constitutional Court?

—Stefanus Hendrianto, Santa Clara University School of Law The political drama of the 2014 Indonesian presidential election has ended with the recent Constitutional Court decision to reject the complaint of the defeated presidential candidate Prabowo Subianto and declare that his rival, Joko Widodo, will be the next Indonesian president. In the presidential election that took

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Published on August 27, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public law

—Rohan Alva, Jindal Global Law School In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on August 18, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Turkey’s Presidential Elections: Towards the Confrontation between Constitutionalism and Power Politics

–Bertil Emrah Oder, Koç University Law School The expected has happened: Prime Minister Erdoğan is the President-elect. He won in the first round of elections on August 10, 2014, by receiving an absolute majority of the valid votes cast, namely 51.79%.[i] He is the second President elected by popular vote after Kenan Evren, leader of

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Published on August 16, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Uncelebrated Union

—Neil Walker, University of Edinburgh [Cross-posted from the Scottish Constitutional Futures Forum Blog] Last week’s first televised debate of the referendum campaign revealed few surprises of tone or content, even if the outcome disappointed pro-independence hopes of a momentum-building surge in support.  As expected, Alex Salmond concentrated on  the core message  of political self-determination, and the

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Published on August 15, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Fateful Elections? Investing in the Future of Europe (I·CON 12, Issue 2: Editorial)

—J. H. H. Weiler, Editorial Director, I·CON; President and Secretary General, European University Institute In a recent Editorial[1] I speculated on the potential transformative effect that the 2014 elections to the European Parliament might have on the democratic fortunes of Europe. I spoke of promise and risk. So now the results are out. How should we

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Published on August 8, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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I.CON’s current issue (Table of Contents)

I.CONVolume 12 Issue 2Table of Contents Editorial Articles Maurice Adams, Disabling constitutionalism. Can the politics of the Belgian Constitution be explained? Greg Taylor, Convention by consensus: Constitutional conventions in Germany Eric C. Ip, The democratic foundations of judicial review under authoritarianism: Theory and evidence from Hong Kong   Symposium: Multipolar Administrative Law Sabino Cassese, Giulio

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Published on August 6, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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Why Hong Kong’s Lawyers Marched

–Alyssa S. King and Alvin Y. H. Cheung On June 27, 2014, up to 1,800 of Hong Kong’s legal professionals, including barristers, who litigate in the courts, and solicitors, who handle all lay client-facing work, marched in silence across the city’s center – for the third time since China resumed sovereignty in 1997[i] – in

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Published on July 2, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Judicial Activism and Forced Displacement: Lessons from the Colombian Paradox

—Cesar Rodríguez-Garavito, Universidad de los Andes and Dejusticia, and Diana Rodríguez-Franco, Northwestern University and Dejusticia Forced displacement affects millions of people in the world and entails a violation of basic human rights.  In many countries, given the lack of institutional capacity,  the main way of addressing this issue is through international human rights law  and

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Published on June 26, 2014
Author:          Filed under: Analysis