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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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The Post-Soviet Constitutional Rights Community

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on December 4, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan: Marbury-Style Judicial Empowerment?

—Neil Modi, Visiting Researcher, Georgetown University Law Center The Pakistani Supreme Court’s decision in District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan (2015) serves as a good illustration of an attempt of judicial self-empowerment, akin to a Marbury v. Madison-style moment.[1] By this I mean that the strategy adopted by the court in this case

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Published on December 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Navigating Constitution Building and Political Transitions in Sri Lanka

—Dian A H Shah, National University Singapore Faculty of Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about

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Published on November 27, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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ICON Book Review: Piotr Mikuli on Wojciech Sadurski’s “Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown”

[Editor’s Note: This book review by Piotr Mikuli of Wojciech Sadurski’s new book, Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown, is forthcoming in the next issue of ICON.] Wojciech Sadurski. Poland’s Constitutional Breakdown. Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 304. ISBN 978-0198840503 The book’s title refers to the expression “constitutional breakdown”, which seems to reflect the author’s profound thoughts regarding

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Published on November 26, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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New Constitution or Nothing! The Promise and Pitfalls of Chile’s Constitutional Moment

—Lisa Hilbink, Department of Political Science, University of Minnesota[1] In the wee hours of Friday, November 15th, Chile reached a historic milestone: Congressional representatives from nearly all political parties, across the political spectrum, signed an agreement to open the path to a new constitution. After four dramatic weeks of mass protests, and following two long

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Published on November 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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“Suraméxit” and Latin American Disintegration

—Juan C. Herrera, Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg What’s going on in Latin America? The socio-political demands throughout the year and especially of recent weeks provide an excellent opportunity to reflect on what could become a South American Spring. Are governments or institutions failing? The general

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Published on November 6, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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On the Protests and Riots in Chile: Why Chile Should Modify its Presidential System

—Sergio Verdugo, Centro de Justicia Constitucional, Universidad de Desarrollo (Chile)[1] There are many ways to approach the demands behind the protests in Chile, and I do not aim to replace or disprove those perspectives. Instead, this essay shows that part of the problem relates to the existence of an unresponsive government and that the explanation

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Published on October 29, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Party Fragmentation Paradox in Brazil: A Shield Against Authoritarianism?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development Brazil features possibly the most fragmented party system in the world. At this current legislative term, there are 25 parties with representation in the Lower House, and 16 in the Senate. The level of fragmentation is so steep that the biggest

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Published on October 24, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Conference Report: Beyond the Usual Suspects and Usual Domains? An ICON-S (Singapore) Symposium

—Maartje De Visser, Singapore Management University, and Jaclyn L. Neo, National University of Singapore Avid readers of this blog need no reminder of the clarion call for those with an interest in constitutionalism to move beyond the ‘usual suspects’. Indeed, the very establishment of ICON-S was inspired by the desire to mainstream an interdisciplinary approach

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Published on October 16, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What the Harvard Decision Gets Right about Affirmative Action

—Yuvraj Joshi, Doctoral Candidate, Yale Law School A federal judge has upheld Harvard College’s admissions program against a challenge from Edward Blum. Her opinion reinforces what I interpret to be the true purpose of affirmative action in the U.S., which is the pursuit of racial transition. Blum is the president of Students for Fair Admission

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Published on October 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments