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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Addendum to Iraq’s Election Quandary

The Speaker of Iraq’s Parliament acknowledge today the inevitability of a “constitutional and legislative vacuum” as a result of the unavoidable gap between the end of the current Parliament’s legislative term and the time before elections can be conducted and a new Parliament and government formed — about two months by the Speaker’s estimation. The

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Published on December 8, 2009
Author:          Filed under: constitutional politics, election, hp, iraq, Jason Gluck
 
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The Election Law Passed But Iraq Still Stands To Miss a Constitutional Dead Line

The impasse over Iraq’s election law has now caused United Nations officials to publicly admit what many have feared for weeks — Iraq is going to miss its constitutionally mandated deadline for parliamentary elections. Delays this past summer and fall were do to two key disagreements among Iraqi law-makers: (1) whether to have open or

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Published on December 7, 2009
Author:          Filed under: constitutional law, election, hp, iraq, Jason Gluck
 
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Iraq’s Elections

The impasse over Iraq’s election law has now caused UN officials to publicly admit what many have known for weeks — Iraq is going to miss its constitutionally mandated deadline for parliamentary elections. At first it was disagreement over how to handle Iraq’s disputed territory of Kirkuk that prevented parliamentarians from passing an election law

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Published on December 4, 2009
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Egypt’s New Chief Justice

Over the summer a new chief justice was appointed to the Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt (the SCC). The appointment of Farouk Sultan was controversial in Egypt. Justice Sultan does not have a distinguished judicial background and is widely thought to lack independence from the executive . The appointment raises all sorts of interesting questions

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State Constitutionalism and the Comparative Project

First, thanks to Zach Elkins and Tom Ginsburg, master scholars, impressarios of the great comparative constitutionalism project, and all-around good guys, for inviting me to guest blog on state constitutionalism and state con law. Second, by way of introduction, I am the Minerva House Drysdale Regents Chair in Law at the University of Texas, recently

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Published on September 4, 2009
Author:          Filed under: constitutional design, hp, United States
 
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Iraq’s Constitutional Review Committee Delivers its Final Report to Parliament

The Iraq Constitutional Review Committee (CRC) submitted its final report to the Iraq Parliament on July 27 with little notice or fanfare – over two and half years after it began its constitutionally mandated comprehensive review, the report comes in at 68 pages (in English) and represents dozens of proposed amendments to the 2005 Constitution.

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Published on August 20, 2009
Author:          Filed under: amendment, constitutional change, federalism, hp, iraq, Jason Gluck
 
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The Constitution of Kosovo and Appointing Judges

One of the benefits of being a law professor in Washington, D.C. is that you have the chance to talk to the many interesting people who happen to be passing through town. For someone interested in comparative constitutional law in particular, this can be quite helpful, as your lunch companions can be valuable sources of

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Published on August 16, 2009
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Canadian Decision on Guantánamo Bay

As noted in this New York Times story, a Federal Court of Appeal in Canada ordered Stephen Harper’s government to become more involved in seeking the release of a Canadian held in American custody.

Published on August 15, 2009
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Collateral Convictions and Comparative Constitutional Law

A new article about the collateral consequences of criminal convictions, with a comparative element looking at constitutional-style constraints on these consequences in several countries: This article explores the racial dimensions of the various collateral consequences that attach to criminal convictions in the United States. The consequences include ineligibility for public and government-assisted housing, public benefits

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Published on August 15, 2009
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Untitled

The Iraq Constitutional Review Committee (CRC) just submitted its final report to Parliament – over two and half years after it began its constitutionally mandated comprehensive review, the report comes in at 65 pages (in English) and represents dozens of amendments to the 2005 Constitution. The report contains a number of important substantive recommendations that

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Published on August 13, 2009
Author:          Filed under: amendment, constitutional change, Jason Gluck