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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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ICON Volume 19, Issue 2: Editorial

Editorial: The unequal impact of the pandemic on scholars with care responsibilities: What can journals (and others) do?; Guest Editorial: Constitutional innovations: Tackling incumbency advantage/abuse; In this issue The unequal impact of the pandemic on scholars with care responsibilities: What can journals (and others) do? COVID-19 has been devastating in all sorts of ways for

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Published on August 7, 2021
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Pre-departure tests for Singapore citizens returning home: possibly constitutionally tricky in theory, but not in practice

—Benjamin Joshua Ong, Assistant Professor of Law, Singapore Management University Introduction Can a state require that its own citizens may only enter upon production of a test result showing that they are not infected with COVID-19? Albania, Greece, Australia, Samoa, India, the Netherlands, and Cyprus have taken such measures at one time or another. On

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Published on August 4, 2021
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How Many Times can Erdoğan be a Presidential Candidate?

—Tolga Şirin, Associate Professor of Constitutional Law, Marmara University, Turkey. Turkey’s new ‘presidentialism alla Turca’ has almost completed its fourth and a half years. The constitutional amendment supporters in the 2017 referendum claimed that the new system would stabilize and strengthen the country and bring a breakthrough in the economic and legal fields. These claims did

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Published on August 3, 2021
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What’s New in Public Law

—Bárbara da Rosa Lazarotto, Master Student at the University of Minho – Portugal; Researcher at the International Legal Research Group on Human Rights and Technology of the European Law Students Association – ELSA, Legal and Compliance Lead at Women4Cyber Portugal Chapter. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public

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Published on August 2, 2021
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ICON’s Latest Issue: Table of Contents

Volume 19 Issue 2 Table of Contents Editorial I•CON: Debate! Gila Stopler, The personal is political: The feminist critique of liberalism and the challenge of right-wing populism Marcela Prieto Rudolphy, Right-wing populism, the reasonable, and the limits of ideal theory: A reply to Gila Stopler Frank Michelman, The bind of tolerance and a call to

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Published on July 30, 2021
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Self-Determination without Democracy: The Curious Case of the Horn of Africa

—Berihun Adugna Gebeye, Humboldt Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, Heidelberg [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] What course the postcolonial state and its people should take to achieve liberation and self-determination,

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Published on July 28, 2021
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Book Roundtable on Margit Cohn’s A Theory of the Executive Branch: Tension and Legality | Part 4 | Tension and Legality: Response to Commentators

—Margit Cohn, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Faculty of Law While writing this book, and after it was published, I hoped that academics would be interested in my work, to an extent that they would not only read the book but, hopefully, both understand its main points, and be driven to comment on some of the

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Published on July 27, 2021
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Book Roundtable on Margit Cohn’s A Theory of the Executive Branch: Tension and Legality | Part 3 | Thinking About Executive Power

—Conor Casey, University of Liverpool School of Law “There is nothing new under the sun” we are told in Ecclesiastes (1:9). This aphorism applies with particular force to public law scholarship, where we see the same conceptual and normative battles being waged in cyclical fashion by successive scholarly generations. Whether it’s over the pros and

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Published on July 24, 2021
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Book Roundtable on Margit Cohn’s A Theory of the Executive Branch: Tension and Legality | Part 2 | To the Executive Branch and Beyond

—Mark A. Graber, University of Maryland Carey School of Law Professor Margit Cohn has written a book that is terrific on two dimensions.  The first concerns substance. Readers will be a lot smarter than they were before reading A Theory of Executive Branch.  Professor Cohnhas much to teach constitutional scholars in the United States, the

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Published on July 24, 2021
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Book Roundtable on Margit Cohn’s A Theory of the Executive Branch: Tension and Legality | Part 1 | Politics as Law: Understanding How (Normatively and Descriptively) to Regulate the Executive Power

—Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School I offer three comments on Professor Cohn’s terrific book, the first and second focused on the implications for law of her analysis, the third sketching a broader jurisprudential “take” on the material. 1. Justice Jackson’s categories. Early in the book, and reiterated later, Professor Cohn mentions Justice Jackson’s three categories

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Published on July 23, 2021
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