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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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COVID-19 Pandemic, Social Distancing, and the Courts: Notes from Hong Kong

—P. Y. Lo, LLB (Lond.), Ph D (HKU), Barrister-at-law, Gilt Chambers, Hong Kong COVID-19 has become a pandemic. To contain and delay the spread of this new strain of the coronavirus, personal hygiene (such as regular handwashing with soap and water) and social distancing (such as avoiding gatherings of large groups of people and working

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Published on March 14, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Vini Singh, Assistant Professor & Doctoral Research Scholar, National Law University Jodhpur, India. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law

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Published on March 9, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Book Review: Jesse Hartery on “Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions” (George Anderson and Sujit Choudhry eds.)

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review Series, Jesse Hartery reviews Territory and Power in Constitutional Transitions (George Anderson and Sujit Choudhry, eds., Oxford University Press, 2019). —Jesse Hartery will be a Law Clerk at the Supreme Court of Canada during the 2020-2021 term. He is the recipient of the 2019 Ronald L. Watts Award from

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Published on March 5, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Libya’s Constitution: Take it Slow

More reflections on the time line currently being considered by Libya’s National Transitional Council and other considerations for the forthcoming constitution making process here: http://www.usip.org/publications/extending-libya-s-transitional-period-capitalizing-the-constitutional-moment

Published on October 24, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional change, hp, HP; constitutional design, Jason Gluck, Libya
 
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Morocco Quiety Reforms Constitution

Without the fanfare (or violence) of Egypt and Tunisia, it seems the Arab Spring is leading to real reform in Morocco. A good summary of the constitutional changes proposed by the King. To be put to national referendum July 1. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/post/a-king-a-speech-and-a-new-constitution-for-morocco/2011/03/29/AGSximcH_blog.html

Published on June 21, 2011
Author:          Filed under: constitutional amendment, constitutional change, hp, Jason Gluck
 
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Recent Commentary on the Proposed Amendments to the Egyptian Constitution

Recently, Tom Ginsburg described in this blog some of the proposed constitutional amendments for the Egyptian Constitution and flagged Tamir Moustafa’s brief analysis of them in foreign policy. It is also worth drawing people’s attention to commentary by two other commentators with long experience watching Egyptian constitutional developments. Each has just today posted interesting thoughts

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Suharto and Mubarak’s Final Days: Similar Trajectories Leading to Very Different Modes of Transition

On The New Republic’s website on February 2, 2011, Thomas Carothers suggested that those leading the Egyptian transition might want to draw some lessons from the experience of Indonesia. He notes several aspects of the Indonesian transition from the regime of Suharto to a new regime that, he believes, helped Indonesia achieve what was, in

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Published on February 13, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Clark Lombardi, constitutional change, coup, Egypt, Indonesia
 
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Andrew Arato on “Egypt’s Transformation: Revolution, Coup, Regime Change, or All of the above?”

Andrew Arato has kindly contributed the following post: “Egypt’s Transformation: Revolution, Coup, Regime Change, or All of the above?”: Among those who believe that in the modern world democracy is a universal value, all have been inspired, amazed and totally convinced by the Egyptian democratic movement. It has accomplished the country’s liberation from its gerontocratic,

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Published on February 12, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Clark Lombardi, constitutional politics, coup, Egypt, emergency powers
 
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What is legality worth in an Egyptian transition?: Some initial thoughts.

Given recent amendments to the Constitution, trying to oust the NDP regime in a formally constitutional manner will delay Mubarak’s formal retirement as head of state for a considerable period and might require significant concessions to current NDP elites. The current Egyptian constitution was enacted in 1971. It was officially named “the Permanent Constitution.” Its

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Published on February 5, 2011
Author:          Filed under: Clark Lombardi, Egypt, hp, rule by law, Supreme Constitutional Court of Egypt
 
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The Price of Legality in an Egyptian Transition, Part II–some other voices weigh in

As I noted in my last post, under the current constitutional scheme in Egypt, elites in the ruling National Democratic Party can hold hostage the “legality” of any quick regime change. To recap: Under the current constitution, as soon as the president is forced out, elections must be held within 2 months and must be

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