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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law

The “C word”: Democratic Decay and the New Frontiers of Comparative Law (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

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On the Looming Split in the Polish Constitutional Order: Harris v Dönges in Central Europe?

—Mikołaj Barczentewicz, University College, University of Oxford As has been widely reported (see, e.g., here), the Polish Constitutional Tribunal is now headed and effectively controlled by the judges appointed in a controversial manner by the Law and Justice (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość, PiS) party. This means that PiS is in a position to view the Tribunal

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What’s New in Public Law

–Simon Drugda, Nagoya University Graduate School of Law (Japan) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant

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The US Same-Sex Marriage Decision: Unconstitutional Constitutional Change?

—Mikołaj Barczentewicz, DPhil in Law Candidate, University of Oxford Much will be written about Obergefell v Hodges, the momentous decision of the US Supreme Court endorsing a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, but in this short blog post I will limit myself to one aspect of the judgment: does it constitute unconstitutional constitutional change? It

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