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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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What’s New in Public Law

—Chiara Graziani, Research Fellow in Comparative Public Law, University of Milan-Bicocca (Italy) and Academic Fellow, Bocconi University (Italy) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts

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Published on September 20, 2021
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Choosing Scylla: climate change vs. private property in Chile’s new constitution

—Ernesto Vargas Weil, Assistant Professor, University of Chile and Associate Lecturer, University College London Climate change is here to stay. A few weeks ago, the UN Secretary-General argued that the last report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Working Group was ‘a code red for humanity’, urging Governments to take immediate action, especially in containing greenhouse

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Published on September 17, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Susan Achury, Visiting Lecturer at Texas Christian University In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books, and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on September 13, 2021
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One Weird Trick To Defeat Judicial Review: Process as Outcome

—Matthew Reid Krell, Lecturer of Law, University of the West Indies Cave Hill As I write this, a puzzling event has occurred in the United States: the law governing access to abortion has changed. But it changed without Congress enacting a law, without the Supreme Court issuing a ruling, and in fact, without anyone taking

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Published on September 12, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Constitutional Chamber in El Salvador and Presidential Reelection: Another Case of Constitutional Authoritarian-Populism

—José Ignacio Hernández G., Fellow, Growth Lab-Center for International Development Harvard; Professor of Administrative Law at Universidad Católica Andrés Bello; Invited Professor, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, and Tashkent University.  A few months after the mass removal of the constitutional judges in El Salvador, the new Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court issued ruling number 1-2021, dated

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Published on September 10, 2021
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When Judges Unbound Ulysses: the Case of Presidential Reelection in El Salvador

—Manuel Adrian Merino Menjivar, Professor of Constitutional Law, Universidad Gerardo Barrios, El Salvador In Ulysses Unbound, Jon Elster understands constitutions as a precommitment made by the people to themselves. According to the myth on which he bases his metaphor, when Ulysses returned from the Trojan War, he had to pass through the Isle of Sirens,

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Published on September 9, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Constituent Power and the Politics of Unamendability

—Mara Malagodi, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law; Rehan Abeyratne, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Faculty of Law; and Ngoc Son Bui, The University of Oxford [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] Judicial interventions in

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Published on September 8, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Brexit, the Irish Protocol and the “Versailles Effect”

[Editor’s Note: This is from the forthcoming editorial in volume 19, issue 3 of ICON] —J.H.H. Weiler, N.Y.U. School of Law; ICON, Co-Editor-in-Chief What does the Treaty of Versailles have to do with Brexit, you may be asking yourself? Quite a lot, I would like to suggest. But a preliminary comment is necessary. In the

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Published on September 7, 2021
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What’s New in Public Law

—Boldizsár Szentgáli-Tóth, research fellow at Centre for Social Sciences, Institute for Legal Studies – Centre of Excellence (Budapest); research fellow at Eotvos Loránd University (Budapest) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent

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Published on September 6, 2021
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Understanding Identity and the Legacy of Empire in European Constitutionalism: The Case of Hungary

—Marina Bán, Postdoctoral Researcher, Centre of Excellence for International Courts, and Jennifer Pullicino Orlando, PhD Student, University of Copenhagen Introduction Hungary’s 2011 Fundamental Law is exemplary of mnemonic constitutionalism and the shaping of identities through the deployment of a defensive nationalism. However, it is also a constitutionalism built on the importance of selective remembrance and

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Published on September 5, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis