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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Symposium | Introduction | The Polish Constitutional Tribunal Decision on the Primacy of EU Law: Alea Iacta Est. Now what?

[Editor’s Note: I-CONnect is pleased to feature a symposium on the recent decision by the Polish Constitutional Tribunal on the primacy of EU law. This introduction will be followed by four posts exploring different aspects of the decision and its impact.] —Antonia Baraggia and Giada Ragone, University of Milan, Italy On October 7, 2021 the

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Published on October 15, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Truth-seeking in Peace Processes: Addressing Colonial Roots of Internal Conflict

—Armi Beatriz E. Bayot, University of Oxford Faculty of Law [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] In negotiating intrastate peace agreements,[1] an important threshold that needs to be crossed by the conflict parties is addressing the meta-conflict, i.e., the

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Published on October 13, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Decriminalization of Abortion: A Landmark Decision by the Mexican Supreme Court

—Joy Monserrat Ochoa Martínez, UNAM and the Mexican Supreme Court, and Roberto Niembro Ortega, Universidad Iberoamericana and the Mexican Supreme Court; co-Chair, ICON-S Mexico Several weeks ago, the Supreme Court issued a landmark judgment recognizing a right to voluntary abortion during the first trimester of pregnancy. The ruling renders several articles of the criminal code

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Published on October 12, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Matteo Mastracci, PhD Researcher, Koç University, Istanbul In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on October 11, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Case for the Inclusion of the Right to Public Participation under Article 21 of the Indian Constitution: A Comparative Constitutional Analysis

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students Ishika Garg and Shamik Datta, National Academy of Legal Studies and Research, Hyderabad (India) Introduction Recently, in Rajeev Suri, the Supreme Court of India (‘SCI’) has recognised participatory democracy as a strong element of the Indian representative democracy, embedded in the Constitution itself. However, the government has failed

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Published on October 7, 2021
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Claudia Marchese, Research Fellow in Comparative Public Law at the University of Florence (Italy) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public

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Published on October 4, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Shortcuts and Short Circuits in Latin American Constitutional Models: a Reading of Cristina Lafont’s Democracy without Shortcuts

—Julian Gaviria-Mira, Universidad EAFIT, Colombia In Democracy without Shortcuts, the philosopher Cristina Lafont has elaborated a compelling defense of what she calls a “deliberative-participatory democracy”. This democracy “without shortcuts” seeks to vindicate, at the same time, both deliberation in democratic institutions and strong participation of the citizens in collective self-government. Curiously, the effort to delineate

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Published on September 30, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Vietnam: Emergency Powers in Time of Pandemic and the Role of the Written Constitution

—Le Nguyen Duy Hau, Attorney at Law This blog post seeks to inform about a new constitutional development in Vietnam surrounding an enabling act formally vesting the Prime Minister (“PM”) with unprecedented emergency powers, and how such an event could provide meaningful suggestions in further research into Vietnam’s constitutional law. In short, I argue that

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Published on September 28, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Nakul Nayak, Assistant Professor at Jindal Global Law School, India. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit

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Published on September 27, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Uncategorized
 
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Is Polarization Necessarily Bad? Lessons from Latin America

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development [Editors’ Note: This is one of our biweekly ICONnect columns. For more information on our four columnists for 2021, please see here.] Polarization is what several political scientists and constitutional scholars have pointed out as possibly the most troubling sign of

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Published on September 22, 2021
Author:          Filed under: Analysis