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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Does Popular Participation in Constitution-Making Matter?

—Alexander Hudson, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. For more information about our four columnists for 2020, please click here.] I·CONnect has recently published a series of excellent essays on the constitution-making process that will soon begin in Chile. One element of

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Published on November 25, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Eman Muhammad Rashwan, Ph.D. Candidate in the European Doctorate in Law & Economics (EDLE), Hamburg University, Germany; Assistant Lecturer of Public Law, Cairo University, Egypt. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly

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Published on November 23, 2020
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Call for Papers — Quaderni costituzionali — “The Environmental Protection in the Constitution”

 “Quaderni costituzionali” – Italian Journal of constitutional law invites submission for the 13th edition of the competition – Call for articles on “The environmental protection in the Constitution” The instance of environmental protection, in its multiple declinations, is the object of several norms and legal commitments of European and international law. These tools find in

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Published on November 22, 2020
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Hungary has sped up in its sliding down the slope towards authoritarianism: the proposed Ninth Amendment and accompanying laws

—Tímea Drinóczi, Department of Constitutional Law, Faculty of Law, University of Pécs, Hungary On 10 November 2020, the Hungarian government submitted the Ninth Amendment to the Fundamental Law (FL) and some other laws to the parliament. These amendments have a great potential to increase the degree of exclusion affecting “others” – that can be the members of

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Published on November 21, 2020
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Acting (or Not Acting) on (Lawful or Unlawful) Advice in Malaysia: From Windsor to Kuantan and Back Again

—Andrew Harding, Centre for Asian Legal Studies, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore As has been previously noted in this blog, Malaysia has been undergoing an unprecedented period of political instability that has tested the interpretation and implementation of many constitutional provisions, especially those relating to the appointment and dismissal of governments.[1] In this

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Published on November 20, 2020
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Black theories matter in achieving a real democracy in Brazil: reflections celebrating the National Black Consciousness Day

— Manuellita Hermes, PhD. Candidate at Università degli Studi di Roma II, Tor Vergata; Rômulo Bittencourt, Master Student of the Graduate-Level Program in Literature and Culture of the Universidade Federal da Bahia. Next November 20th is the National Black Consciousness Day (Dia da Consciência Negra) in Brazil. Specially in 2020, the resurgence of a racial debate in Brazil and

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Published on November 19, 2020
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The Colombian Model of Judicial Review of Legislation: A Predecessor to the Austrian Constitutional Court of 1920

—Mario Alberto Cajas Sarria, Universidad Icesi, Colombia[1] It is 100 years since the creation of the Austrian Constitutional Court (October, 1920), which gave rise to the “Austrian Model” of judicial review of a concentrated and specialized Constitutional Court,[2] that spread across Europe with its adaptations and migrated to other continents[3]. On this Centenary, it is

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Published on November 19, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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The Institutional Interest of Political Parties in Chile’s Constitution-Making Process

—Benjamin Alemparte, Duke University School of Law These are times of constitutional change in Chile.[1] On October 25, the referendum’s approval option for drafting a new Constitution won with close to 80% of the general vote, the most significant electoral gap in the country’s history. Notably, more than 50% of the registered electorate went to vote,

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Published on November 17, 2020
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What’s New in Public Law

—Gaurav Mukherjee, S.J.D. Candidate in Comparative Constitutional Law, Central European University, Budapest. In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere.

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Published on November 16, 2020
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Constitutionalism and Multi-Level Governance: Ran Hirschl on Megacities in Constitutional Democracies

—Estefânia Maria de Queiroz Barboza, Federal University of Paraná, and Lucas Henrique Muniz da Conceição, Birkbeck College, University of London On October 30, the Brazilian Chapter of the ICON-S promoted an international conference on the theme of Megacities and Constitutional Law. Presenting his novel academic contribution Prof. Ran Hirschl provided a keynote address regarding his

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Published on November 15, 2020
Author:          Filed under: Analysis