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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Special Undergraduate Series–The Misplaced Objections Against the Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, 2019 (India)

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law StudentsLL.B. Student Contribution –Anmol Jain, B.A., LL.B. Student (Hons.), National Law University, Jodhpur, India Last month, the Lower House of the Indian Parliament passed the Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Bill, 2019 to ‘provide for protection of rights of transgender persons and their welfare.’ This comes after a series

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Published on September 15, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Call for Papers–European Journal of International Law–Inequalities in International Law: The EJIL Symposium 2021

International law in the UN Charter, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and other foundational treaties and conventions of the multilateral system entails a premise (and promise) of equal rights, the right to self-determination, and the fundamental equality of human beings. However, during the last 10 years and in the wake of the 2008 financial

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Published on September 14, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: The Prerogative, The Third Source, and Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: This is the fourth entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Max Harris, University of Oxford Administrative lawyers and administrative law theorists ignore the prerogative and the third source at their peril. Wherever the exact boundaries of administrative law theory are drawn,

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Published on September 13, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Maitland’s Challenge

[Editor’s Note: This is the third entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Jacob Weinrib, Queen’s Faculty of Law In the final years of the nineteenth century, FW Maitland looked to “the real practical working of English public law”[1] and observed a transformation: “The

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Published on September 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Systematically Studying Review of Reason-Giving

[Editor’s Note: This is the second entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Joanna Bell, University of Cambridge In a thought-provoking blogpost published earlier this year, Richard Kirkham & Elizabeth O’Loughlin made a case for greater systematic study of administrative law issues. Academic commentary

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Published on September 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory: Administrative Law and Democracy

[Editor’s Note: This is the first entry in an eight-part Showcase on new ideas in administrative law theory. The introductory post is available here.] –Hasan Dindjer, University of Oxford Decisions by public authorities are often thought to possess a democratic imprimatur which properly insulates them from certain kinds of interference by courts. Executive and administrative

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Published on September 10, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Davide Bacis, PhD Student in Constitutional Law, University of Pavia (Italy) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To

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Published on September 9, 2019
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Showcase–New Directions in Administrative Law Theory

[Editor’s Note: In this “Showcase,” we feature a series of posts introducing new ideas in theoretical approaches to administrative law. These ideas emerged from papers presented in a workshop at the University of Oxford organized by Thomas Adams, Hasan Dindjer and Adam Perry. This Showcase will feature eight sets of new ideas. In this post,

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Published on September 8, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Announcement–New Book: “Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions” (OUP 2019)

—Richard Albert, William Stamps Farish Professor in Law and Professor of Government, The University of Texas at Austin Last month, Oxford University Press (OUP) published my book on “Constitutional Amendments: Making, Breaking, and Changing Constitutions.” It is available from OUP here at a 30% discount with this promotion code: ALAUTHC4. Here is a short description

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Published on September 7, 2019
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Deadline: September 15–Call for Papers–Symposium on “When is a Constitutional Amendment Illegitimate?”–National University of Singapore–March 19-20, 2020

The National University of Singapore Faculty of LawCentre for Asian Legal Studies in collaboration with the The University of Texas at Austininvite submissions for Symposium on “When is a Constitutional Amendment Illegitimate?” The National University of Singapore (NUS)Faculty of LawMarch 19-20, 2020 Convened by Jaclyn Neo (NUS)Kevin Tan (NUS)Richard Albert (Texas) Submissions are invited from early-career

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Published on September 6, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments