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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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The Joint Declaration to the Inter-American System of Human Rights: Backlash or Contestation?

—Melina Girardi Fachin (Universidade Federal do Paraná); Bruna Nowak (Universidade Federal do Paraná) In April 2019, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Paraguay issued a joint declaration to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights with critical observations directed to the Inter-American System of Human Rights. The states reaffirmed their commitment to the American Convention on Human

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Published on December 12, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Disenfranchisement of EU Citizens: A Constitutional Cacophony

–Antonios Kouroutakis, Assistant Professor, IE University There is a paradox with the EU citizenship. While EU nationals exercise their right of free movement and their right to reside freely in any Member state of the EU, they are politically disenfranchised and lose the right to vote in the national elections of their country of origin.

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Published on December 11, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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10 Good Reads

––J. H. H. Weiler, New York University School of Law; Co-Editor-in-Chief, I·CON It is the time of year once more when I publish my pick from some of the books that came my way since my last “Good Reads” listing. These are not book reviews in the classical and rigorous sense of the word, for which

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Published on December 9, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Editorials
 
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What’s New in Public Law

—Maja Sahadžić, Research Fellow, University of Antwerp In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on December 9, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Coup d’État that Wasn’t. Does the Latest Revolt in Bolivia Reveal Limitations of a Concept or the Failure of Scholars Using it?

—Franz Xavier Barrios-Suvelza, Erfurt University  The latest events in Bolivia unleashed a vivid polemic in the media on whether the unconventional interruption of Evo Morales’ mandate as of this 10th of November was a coup d’État. I claim that the Bolivian case reveals the need to rethink whether the category coup d’État can be reasonably

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Published on December 8, 2019
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Lack of Transparency in Selection of the Danish Ombudsman: Old Habits Die Hard

—Simon Drugda, PhD Candidate at the University of Copenhagen Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman Jørgen Steen Sørensen resigned from office on November 1 to take on the job of a Supreme Court judge. Sørensen had announced his intention to resign on short notice because of the extraordinary circumstance of his audition for a Supreme Court judge.[1] However,

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Published on December 7, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Post-Soviet Constitutional Rights Community

—William Partlett, Melbourne Law School [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2019,

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Published on December 4, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Nausica Palazzo, Post-Doctoral Researcher, University of Trento In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on December 2, 2019
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District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan: Marbury-Style Judicial Empowerment?

—Neil Modi, Visiting Researcher, Georgetown University Law Center The Pakistani Supreme Court’s decision in District Bar Association, Rawalpindi v. Federation of Pakistan (2015) serves as a good illustration of an attempt of judicial self-empowerment, akin to a Marbury v. Madison-style moment.[1] By this I mean that the strategy adopted by the court in this case

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Published on December 1, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Deprivation of Citizenship for Terrorism: First Application in Switzerland

–Rekha Oleschak-Pillai, Institute of Federalism, University of Fribourg In a quietly worded press release on 11 September 2019, the Swiss Federal Office for Migration (SEM) announced that it had revoked the Swiss citizenship of a dual citizen for the first time.[1] Revocation of citizenship of a second person is currently underway[2]. Switzerland has thus joined

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Published on November 29, 2019
Author:          Filed under: Developments