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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2017 May (Page 2)
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Constitutional Amendments in Georgia: Towards Parliamentarism

—Malkhaz Nakashidze, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Boston College Law School; Assocoate Professor, Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University School of Law On December 15, 2016, the Parliament of Georgia created the State Constitutional Commission.[1] The aim of the Commission was to elaborate the Draft law on revision of the Constitution of Georgia in the interest of the long-term democratic development

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Published on May 12, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Democratic Decay in ‘Keystone’ Democracies: The Real Threat to Global Constitutionalism? (I-CONnect Column)

—Tom Gerald Daly, Fellow, Melbourne Law School; Associate Director, Edinburgh Centre for Constitutional Law [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts.

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Published on May 10, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence and Reform” in Pisa, Italy

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Giuseppe Martinico (Sant’Anna), Antonia Baraggia (Milan), Cristina Fasone (LUISS) and I are convening a symposium on “The Constitution of Canada: History, Evolution, Influence and Reform” at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna in Pisa, Italy on Wednesday, May 24, 2017. The symposium, held in memory of Alessandro Pizzorusso, will gather scholars to

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Published on May 9, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Vicente F. Benítez R., Constitutional Law Professor, Universidad de La Sabana (Colombia) and LL.M. student at NYU In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from

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Published on May 8, 2017
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“Constitutional Dismemberment” and Political Crisis in Brazil: Populism in Sight?

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasília Jon Elster once wrote that “… the task of constitution-making generally emerges in conditions that are likely to work against good constitution-making.”[1] Passion – as he puts it – prevails over reason in such turbulent circumstances. When it comes to other forms of substantial constitutional change, such as what

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Published on May 6, 2017
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Conference on “The Separation of Powers: A Global Constitutional Dialogue” at the University of Milan, May 22, 2017

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Antonia Baraggia (Milan), Luca Vanoni (Milan), Cristina Fasone (LUISS) and I are convening a conference on “The Separation of Powers: A Global Constitutional Dialogue.” We will gather at the University of Milan on Monday, May 22, 2017, at Sala Napoleonica, via Sant’Antonio 12. The conference is inspired by the

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Published on May 5, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Populist Constitutionalism

—Paul Blokker, Charles University in Prague [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Populist engagement with constitution-making and constitutional reform forms a distinctive, and in significant ways worrying, tendency. Populism is explicitly present in the constitutional politics of

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Judges Speaking for the People: Judicial Populism Beyond Judicial Decisions

—Diego Werneck Arguelhes, Getulio Vargas Foundation Law School (FGV Direito Rio — Brazil); Information Society Project, Yale Law School (Spring 2017) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] We typically think of courts as victims or targets of

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Working Well Is The Best Strategy: Judges under Populism

—Juan F. González-Bertomeu, ITAM (Mexico) [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction: foes of all stripes Let’s start with this truism—no administration, populist or not, wants courts meddling with them and checking on their power. Administrations often

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Published on May 4, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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In Defense of Judicial Populism: Lessons From Colombia

—Jorge González-Jácome, Stanford University and Universidad de los Andes [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here.] Introduction In 2005, the Colombian Constitutional Court upheld an amendment allowing presidential reelection. An extremely popular President elected for the 2002-2006 period,

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Published on May 3, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis