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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
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Populist Constitutions – A Contradiction in Terms?

—Jan-Werner Müller, Princeton University [Editor’s Note: This post is part of the joint I-CONnect/Verfassungsblog mini-symposium on populism and constitutional courts. An introduction to the symposium can be found here. Professor Müller’s post is adapted from his book What is Populism? (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and from “Populism and Constitutionalism,” forthcoming in the Oxford Handbook of Populism.]

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Published on April 23, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Introduction: Constitutional Courts and Populism

—Michaela Hailbronner, University of Münster, Germany, and David Landau, Florida State University College of Law This mini-symposium is a joint project between the editors of the Verfassungsblog and the editors of I-Connect. We have brought together a number of prominent scholars, working on different issues, approaches, and regions of the world, and invite contributions by others,

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Published on April 22, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Call for Papers–“What can Central and Eastern Europe Learn from the Development of Canada’s Constitutional System?”–Budapest, Hungary–28 June 2017

Call for Papers International Symposium on  What can Central and Eastern Europe Learn from the Development of Canada’s Constitutional System? On the Occasion of the 150th Anniversary of Confederation Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Faculty of Law Egyetem tér 1-3. Budapest, Hungary 28 June 2017 Convened by Pál Sonnevend Nóra Chronowski Eszter Bodnár Zoltán Pozsár-Szentmiklósy This

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Published on April 21, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Mandatory Voting as a Tool to Combat the “New Populism”

—András László Pap, Research Chair, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Centre for Social Sciences Institute for Legal Studies; SASPRO-Marie-Curie Fellow, Slovak Academy of Sciences Institute for Sociology; Recurrent Visiting (Adjunct) Professor, Central European University; Professor, National University of Public Service, Budapest, and Anna Śledzińska-Simon, Assistant Professor, University of Wrocław   The Hungarian and Polish experience of constitutional capture

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Published on April 19, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Sandeep Suresh, LL.M in Comparative Constitutional Law (Central European University, Budapest) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To

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Published on April 17, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s at Stake in the Turkish Constitutional Amendment Proposal

–Ilayda Gunes, The University of Chicago Law School In the wake of the failed coup attempt of July 15, 2016, Turkey has been struggling to heal its wounds under a state of emergency. Apart from the loss of hundreds of lives and more than 2,000 injured in clashes during the abortive coup, the country has also

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Published on April 14, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Venezuela’s Recent Constitutional Crisis: Lessons to be Learned From a Failed Judicial Coup D’etat (I-CONnect Column)

—Javier Couso, Universidad Diego Portales [Editor’s note: This is one of our biweekly I-CONnect columns. Columns, while scholarly in accordance with the tone of the blog and about the same length as a normal blog post, are a bit more “op-ed” in nature than standard posts. For more information about our four columnists for 2017,

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Published on April 12, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Chaos, Kings, and Thailand’s 20th Constitution

—Khemthong Tonsakulrungruang, Chulalongkorn University After three years, three commissions, and millions of Baht spent, Thailand’s 20th Constitution finally came into effect. On the 6th day of April 2017, King Vajiralongkorn signed the Constitution in presence of the royal family members, courtiers, the cabinet, members of the National Legislative Assembly (NLA), judges, diplomats, and other bureaucrats at

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Published on April 11, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Public Law

–Simon Drugda, Nagoya University Graduate School of Law (Japan) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on April 10, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Five Questions with Donald Horowitz

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In “Five Questions with … ” here at I-CONnect, we invite a public law scholar to answer five questions about his or her research. This edition of “Five Questions with … ” features Donald Horowitz, the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science Emeritus at Duke University and

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Published on April 7, 2017
Author:          Filed under: Reviews