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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2016 (Page 15)
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Judicial Appointments in the Commonwealth: Is India Bucking the Trend?

Cross-posted with permission from the UK Constitutional Law Association Blog. The original post appears here. –Dr Jan van Zyl Smit, Associate Senior Research Fellow, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law In recent years many Commonwealth states have adopted, or at least debated, reforms to their

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Published on March 8, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Patrick Yingling, Reed Smith LLP In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on March 7, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Developments in Italian Constitutional Law: The Year 2015 in Review

[Editor’s Note: In this special post, we feature a 2015 year-in-review of developments in Italian Constitutional Law. We are grateful to Marta Cartabia, Pietro Faraguna, Michele Massa and Diletta Tega for this important contribution to the study of comparative public law. We hope this will serve as a model for other scholars interested in preparing similar reports on

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Published on March 4, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Call for Nominations: Harold Berman Prize for Excellence in Law & Religion Scholarship

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School In my capacity as Chair of the AALS Section on Law & Religion, I have created a new award to recognize junior professors for scholarly excellence in the field. I invite our readers to nominate colleagues for the award, which will be named the “Harold Berman Prize.” Self-nominations are welcome

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Published on March 2, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Way Out of Hyper-Reformism? A Project of Constitutional Reorganization and Consolidation in Mexico

—Andrea Pozas-Loyo, IIJ-UNAM Mexico has one of the world’s oldest and most amended constitutions: its 99-year old constitution has been amended 642 times. De jure, Mexico’s constitution is pretty rigid: amendments require three-quarters of the present members of congress and approval of the majority of the states’ legislatures. During the hegemonic-party period, the PRI had

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Published on March 2, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Norway: New Chief Justice Appointed to the Supreme Court

–Anine Kierulf, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo Law School As of today, March 1, 2016, the Norwegian Supreme Court has a new Chief Justice: Toril Øie, the first female Chief in its 200 years.[1] Øie replaces Tore Schei,[2] Chief Justice since 2002. Norwegian Supreme Court Justices are appointed for life,

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Published on March 1, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Sandeep Suresh, Research Associate, Daksh India (Rule of Law Project) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To

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Published on February 29, 2016
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Interpreting Unamendable Clauses: Brazil’s New Precedent on the Presumption of Innocence

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasilia On February 17, the Brazilian Supreme Court, after having overturned its precedent on presumption of innocence,[1] spurred a heated debate over the limits of interpretation of petrified or unamendable clauses of the Brazilian constitution. In an unexpected decision on a writ of habeas corpus,[2] the majority[3] held that the

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Published on February 29, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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I•CON Debate Review by Nicolás Figueroa: Constituent Power and Constitutional Revolution

[Editor’s Note: In this special installment of I•CONnect’s Review Series, Nicolás Figueroa offers a critical review of the I•CON debate between Mark Tushnet and Jan Komárek on constituent power and constitutional revolution. The debate appears in the current issue of I•CON, beginning with Tushnet’s paper here, followed by a reply by Komárek here, and concluding with a rejoinder from Tushnet here.] Review by

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Published on February 25, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Leading by Opposition: Justice Scalia and Comparative Constitutional Law

—Claudia E. Haupt, Columbia Law School As tributes to Justice Antonin Scalia are pouring in, a common theme is emerging among those of us who tended to disagree with him in most cases: he made us think harder. As Jamal Greene, himself a scholar of comparative constitutional law, remarked: “What he did was change how

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Published on February 24, 2016
Author:          Filed under: Developments