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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
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Institutions Matter: The Brazilian Supreme Court’s Decision on Impeachment

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasilia Judicial review of the legislative process is certainly one of the mo­­st sensitive areas of the relationship between the Judiciary and Parliament. In comparative law, there is no clear trend. In the United States, the enrolled bill doctrine, which claims that courts are required to accept that “a bill

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Published on December 31, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Strange Case of Dr. Jokowi and Mr. Hyde: Religious Freedom at the Crossroads in Indonesia

–Stefanus Hendrianto, University of Notre Dame Since the 2014 election in Indonesia, many have highlighted the rise of President Joko Widodo, commonly known as Jokowi, who came from a humble beginning to beat an establishment figure in Indonesia.[1] One of the highlights of Jokowi’s meteoric rise is his record among religious minorities. When Jokowi began

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Published on December 29, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on December 28, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Middle Ground for Democratic Accountability: Retention Elections for the House of Lords?

—Brian Christopher Jones, Liverpool Hope University Through the eyes of many the UK House of Lords cannot seem to do anything right. Westminster’s upper house continues to be one of the largest and most disparaged institutions in modern times. Ridicule of the institution predominantly occurs because after more than a century of attempted reform the House

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Published on December 23, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Mohamed Abdelaal, Alexandria University (Egypt) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on December 21, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Administrative Law 3.0

—Georgios Dimitropoulos, Max Planck Institute Luxembourg On September 15, 2015, President Obama issued an Executive Order that is expected to have a significant influence on US administrative law. The Executive Order — Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People is moreover an important milestone in the 200-year plus history of administrative law that went rather unnoticed.

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Published on December 18, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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Book Review/Response: Rayner Thwaites and Daniel Wilsher on Indefinite Detention of Non-Citizens

[Editor’s Note: In this installment of I•CONnect’s Book Review/Response Series, Daniel Wilsher reviews Rayner Thwaites’ recent book on The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014). Rayner Thwaites then responds to the review.] Review by Daniel Wilsher –Daniel Wilsher, City University London, reviewing Rayner Thwaites, The Liberty of Non-Citizens: Indefinite Detention in Commonwealth Countries (Hart 2014)

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Published on December 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Rohan Alva, Advocate, India In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for our

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Published on December 14, 2015
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When is a Criminal Prohibition of Genocide Denial Justified? Lessons from Perinçek Case

—Javid Gadirov, Assistant Professor, ADA University (Azerbaijan) It may seem surprising to readers in the United States that there is a criminal prohibition of the denial of the Holocaust in Germany, and of genocides and crimes against humanity in other European countries. The First Amendment’s robust protection does not allow any specific exceptions for hate speech. Speech

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Published on December 11, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Closing Remarks at Symposium on “Comparative Constitutional Change: New Perspectives on Formal and Informal Amendment”

[Editor’s note: In 2014, I organized the inaugural AALS Academic Symposium. The subject of the Symposium was “Comparative Constitutional Change: New Perspectives on Formal and Informal Amendment,” and the program was held in New York City at the AALS Annual Meeting. Half of the papers have been published in the latest issue of ICON; the other

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Published on December 9, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis