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I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2015 July (Page 2)
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The Reframing of Local Government in the UK

—Michèle Finck, University of Oxford After the independence referendum that took place in Scotland in September 2014, the UK is reflecting on a new decentralisation arrangement. While Scotland voted against independence, these negotiations are nonetheless underway as David Cameron had promised Scots that, should they stay within the UK, they would receive more independence in administering

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Published on July 15, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Right to Vote of Hungarian Citizens Living Abroad

—Eszter Bodnár, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary Péter and Pál were neighbors in Luxembourg. Péter was member of the Hungarian minority in Romania and arrived in Luxembourg in 2008 to work there at an international company. Due to the favorable new rules, he obtained Hungarian citizenship in 2010. Pál got a one-year contract at the

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Published on July 14, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on July 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Statement by Constitutional Scholars in Support of Japanese Students and Citizens Protesting Prime Minister Abe’s Reinterpretation of Pacifist Constitution

Editor’s note: Although we do not regularly do so, we occasionally will issue statements that may be of professional interest to our members. Those interested in adding their names to the below can contact Tom Ginsburg at tginsburg@uchicago.edu Statement by constitutional scholars in support of Japanese students and citizens protesting Prime Minister Abe’s reinterpretation of

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Published on July 10, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The US Same-Sex Marriage Decision: Unconstitutional Constitutional Change?

—Mikołaj Barczentewicz, DPhil in Law Candidate, University of Oxford Much will be written about Obergefell v Hodges, the momentous decision of the US Supreme Court endorsing a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, but in this short blog post I will limit myself to one aspect of the judgment: does it constitute unconstitutional constitutional change? It

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Published on July 8, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
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Call for Papers–Symposium on Quasi-Constitutionality and Constitutional Statutes–Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

The New Zealand Centre for Public Law at Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Law in partnership with The International Society of Public Law (ICON·S) and Boston College Law School invite submissions for Symposium on Quasi-Constitutionality and Constitutional Statutes Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Law Thursday & Friday, May 19-20, 2016 The New Zealand

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Published on July 6, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Mohamed Abdelaal, Alexandria University (Egypt) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on July 6, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Corporate Campaign Contributions in Brazil: Of Courts, Congresses, and the Agendas of Individual Justices

—Juliano Zaiden Benvindo, University of Brasilia Debates over the relationship between Congress and the Judiciary are quite common in the comparative constitutional literature, especially in the current scenario of rising activism of constitutional courts worldwide. Particularly interesting is to observe how Supreme Courts and Parliaments negotiate the pace of their decisions, sometimes in a symbiotic

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Published on July 3, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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The Greek Crisis–A Symptom of the EU’s Constitutional Malaise

—Nicole Scicluna, Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), University of Birmingham The euro crisis started in Greece and to Greece it returned. Since the Syriza government’s election in January 2015, we have seen a succession of intense and sometimes acrimonious exchanges between Greek officials and representatives of the IMF, EU and member state governments, which

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Published on July 2, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments