magnify

I·CONnect

Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law
Home 2015 June (Page 2)
formats

What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Angelique Devaux, French Licensed Attorney (Notaire) In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

Read More…

Published on June 15, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Words to a Delegate: Crafting Article V

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution –Larissa Warren, rising 3L, Boston College Law School [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to

Read More…

Published on June 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
formats

Global Standards of Constitutional Law: What Knowledge? What Method?

—Maxime St-Hilaire, University of Sherbrooke Over the past few years, I have been led to try to draw theoretical implications and conclusions (not to mention political and moral ones) from new forms of constitutional law practice such as the Venice Commission’s, a broad advisory organ of the Council of Europe. When it was created in

Read More…

Published on June 12, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis, New Voices
 
formats

On Abusive Constitutionalism: Two Critical Impulses

—Jorge González-Jácome, Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia The relationship between constitutionalism and authoritarianism is not simple. Some might argue that they are opposing concepts but a very suggestive article by David Landau has coined the term abusive constitutionalism to refer to the use of tools of constitutional amendment and constitutional replacement used by would-be autocrats to

Read More…

Published on June 11, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
formats

ICON-S/Koc/BC Workshop on Unamendable Constitutional Provisions

—Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Yesterday, the International Society of Public Law (ICON-S) hosted a workshop on unamendable constitutional provisions in partnership with Koc University Law School and Boston College Law School. The event was held on the picturesque campus of Koc University in Istanbul, and sponsored generously by Professor Bertil Emrah Oder, Dean of Koc

Read More…

Published on June 10, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Chain Reaction: Constitutional Change Through Election Law Reform in Italy–Likely Scenarios After the Recent Reform of the Parliament Election Law

—Erik Longo (University of Macerata) and Andrea Pin (University of Padua)[1] While many people’s eyes were on UK general elections, another European country was setting out for a decisive constitutional shift. In the past, Italians repeatedly tried to amend their bicameral structure, which is composed of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate, but they never succeeded. Now

Read More…

Published on June 9, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Margaret Lan Xiao, Washington University in St. Louis In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant

Read More…

Published on June 8, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

Norway: Human Rights and Judicial Review Constitutionalized

–Anine Kierulf, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, University of Oslo Law School Today Norway made judicial review part of its written constitution. This amendment marks the finalization of a human rights reform of Norway’s 200 year-old constitution. While but a codification of a 150-yearlong court-made practice of review, it also adds democratic legitimacy

Read More…

Published on June 5, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

The Constitutional Referendum in Comparative Perspective: Same-Sex Marriage in Ireland and Australia

—Scott Stephenson, Melbourne Law School The significance of Ireland’s recent referendum on same-sex marriage extends well beyond its borders. The result, in which a majority of voters approved an amendment to the Irish Constitution allowing two persons to marry without distinction as to their sex, has sparked a flurry of debate and legislative activity in

Read More…

Published on June 4, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
formats

The Gay Cake Case from Northern Ireland: Possibly Instructive for the U.S.?

—Ioanna Tourkochoriti, Lecturer, National University of Ireland, Galway Should businesses have the right to refuse to provide goods and services to homosexuals on the basis of their freedom of religion? The question has stirred a lot of debate recently in the U.S. on the occasion of the enactment of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act in

Read More…

Published on June 3, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments