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Blog of the International Journal of Constitutional Law and ConstitutionMaking.org
Home 2015 February
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Book Review: “Process and Procedure in EU Administration”

–Luca de Lucia, University of Salerno, reviewing Carol Harlow & Richard Rawlings, Process and Procedure in EU Administration (Hart Publishing, December 2014, 352pp) This book by Carol Harlow and Richard Rawlings brings an important enrichment to the literature on European public law. Administrative procedure is at the centre of the analysis and is defined as ‘a course of

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Published on February 27, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Reviews
 
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Video Now Available for Panel on “The War on Japan’s Pacifist Constitution”

–Richard Albert, Boston College Law School Last semester here at Boston College, we convened a panel discussion on “The War on Japan’s Pacifist Constitution. The video for this program is now available here. The panel featured Tom Ginsburg (Chicago), Tokujin Matsudaira (Kanagawa) and Franziska Seraphim (Boston College). Tom Ginsburg has written about the Japanese Constitution in

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Published on February 25, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Rohan Alva, Jindal Global Law School In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments

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Published on February 23, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?

Special Series: Perspectives from Undergraduate Law Students J.D. Student Contribution [Editor’s note: The students in my advanced seminar on constitutional amendment wrote excellent papers in their take-home examination for the course. They were given a choice of two questions to answer: (1) “Is the United States Constitution Too Difficult to Amend?”; or (2) “Assume the year is

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Published on February 20, 2015
Author:          Filed under: New Voices
 
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Mercy and Judicial Review in the Commonwealth

—Adam Perry, Lecturer in Law, Queen Mary University of London Judges in Commonwealth jurisdictions are increasingly willing to review the executive’s decisions to grant or refuse mercy (ie, decisions to grant or refuse a request for a pardon or remission of a sentence for a criminal offence). Here I want to sketch the developments and mention

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Published on February 18, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Analysis
 
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What’s New in Comparative Public Law

–Patrick Yingling, Reed Smith LLP In this weekly feature, I-CONnect publishes a curated reading list of developments in comparative public law. “Developments” may include a selection of links to news, high court decisions, new or recent scholarly books and articles, and blog posts from around the comparative public law blogosphere. To submit relevant developments for

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Published on February 16, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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ICON-S 2015 Conference in New York City, July 1-3, 2015—Call for Papers & Panels—Public Law in an Uncertain World

I-CONnect is pleased to announce the Call for Papers & Panels below for the 2015 Conference of ICON-S: the International Society of Public Law. ICON-S, a new international learned society now entering its second year, is guided by a Pro Term Executive Committee featuring many of the world’s leading scholars in the field of public law. This edition of the ICON-S

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Published on February 15, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Judging the Bankers (or Not): The Rise of the ECB and the Transformation of EU Constitutionalism

—Nicole Scicluna, Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), University of Birmingham The European Central Bank (ECB) embodies the politicised technocracy that characterises EU governance. It was pushed to centre stage by the euro crisis and by national governments’ unwillingness or inability to come up with timely and credible solutions. Despite protestations by former chief, Jean-Claude

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Published on February 13, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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A Spectre Resurfaces: Chinese National Security Legislation and Hong Kong

—Alvin Y.H. Cheung, Visiting Scholar, U.S.-Asia Law Institute, NYU School of Law National security legislation has been a “third rail” of Hong Kong politics since 500,000 people marched in protest against the National Security (Legislative Provisions) Bill on July 1, 2003 – ultimately forcing then-Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa to resign.  Nonetheless, in the wake of

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Published on February 12, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments
 
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Fundamental Rights, Physician-Assisted Death and the Court’s Institutional Role: A Comment on Carter v. Canada (Attorney General)

—Robert Leckey, McGill University, author of the forthcoming Bills of Rights in the Common Law (Cambridge University Press, May 2015) On 6 February 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada reversed its ruling on assisted suicide. In 1993, in a five-four decision, the Court had ruled that the federal government’s blanket ban on assisted suicide complied with the Canadian

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Published on February 9, 2015
Author:          Filed under: Developments